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Hands On Destiny 2 Impressions. (Destiny)

by INSANEdrive, ಥ_ಥ, Thursday, May 18, 2017, 18:40 (8 days ago)

No. Not from me. I'm not cool like Wu. *Cries Internally* :D ... anyway...

IGN

After playing this slice for myself, I tried out a Strike. Set on Io, it was a vast, colorful, tense adventure with my two teammates that felt, I imagine, like a mini-Raid. More so than the solid Strikes in Destiny 1. To be quite clear: I was incredibly impressed by this Strike. It deftly mixed platforming, pedal-to-the-metal enemy encounters, teleporting across massive distances, and a phenomenal three-stage boss fight to finish it up. If the rest of Destiny 2’s strikes can match the intensity and artistic splendor of this one, then I’ll be one happy Guardian.

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Kotaku

From a design standpoint, everything I played could have been in a Destiny expansion. Watching it run on at the usual 30fps on PS4, it’s basically just more Destiny. Sure, the UI has been tweaked, and there are a few new abilities. But generally speaking, this demo walks, talks, and quacks like Destiny. But while the game I was playing wasn’t much different from the Destiny I’ve sank so many hours into, the difference on PC really was dramatic. The PC version doesn’t have a firm release date, but once all three versions are out, it’s going to be tough to decide which version to stick with.

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PCGamesN

While bullet-sponge enemies can be annoying, Destiny 2 counters with impressive weapons and abilities - you'll want enemies to last that little bit longer so you can see these skills in action. In the campaign I played as a Warlock Dawnblade and its new Super: sprouting angel wings and hovering above the ground while hurling giant flaming swords below. As a Titan Striker I used a lightning strike as seen in the original game, but with a few tweaks that make it just that touch more exciting to execute. But even if you are playing as a familiar sub-class, there are new elements; the Titan, for example, can tap V to lay down a holographic piece of cover. The Warlocks have whirlwind-like rifts that can heal or buff, while Hunters get a new dodge move. Even if you're vastly familiar with Destiny, it seems like there are new toys that change the moment-to-moment action in subtle but interesting ways.

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Pocket-Lint

The Strike mission we played was The Inverted Spire in the Arcadian Valley on one of the new planets, Nessus. That planet was structured by the Vex, so you can guess what type of enemies we faced.

We won't spoil it too much, as you'll no doubt get to play the mission yourself at some point, but a vast majority of it is platform based and there is an incredible section with giant drill bits swooping above and below you as you try to traverse the landscape.

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Gamequit

It’s here in the Crucible that I really noticed the changes to weapon classes. The new kinetic, energy, and power weapon split means that sniper and shotgun play appears to be far less viable than it was in Destiny 1. If you’re especially devoted to that style of play, you can certainly grab the power ammo when it spawns, but you’re putting yourself in danger to grab it, and the ammo only drops for yourself, so you’re denying that power ammo to another player on your team.

The bomb setting and defusing leads to a lot of compelling tension. Once a bomb is set, the defending team must find a way to defuse it in time. Often, that means a tense few moments of waiting (no timer shows on the defuse) to see whether you’ll turn off the bomb in time.

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