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NES Classic Discontinued (Gaming)

by Blackt1g3r @, Kansas City, MO, Thursday, April 13, 2017, 13:07 (43 days ago)

That was an incredibly short run and they aren't going to make any more even if there is demand for it.

http://www.ign.com/articles/2017/04/13/nintendo-discontinues-the-nes-classic-edition

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That Was Fast.

by Morpheus @, High Charity, Thursday, April 13, 2017, 14:00 (43 days ago) @ Blackt1g3r

;-)

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NES Classic Discontinued

by Cody Miller, Dinklebot - Never Forget, Friday, April 14, 2017, 08:24 (42 days ago) @ Blackt1g3r

That was an incredibly short run and they aren't going to make any more even if there is demand for it.

http://www.ign.com/articles/2017/04/13/nintendo-discontinues-the-nes-classic-edition

Given the choice between manufacturing capacity for that or for the switch, you can see how they would use the capacity for the switch.

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NES Classic Discontinued

by cheapLEY @, Interstate 8, Friday, April 14, 2017, 12:17 (42 days ago) @ Cody Miller

Given the choice between manufacturing capacity for that or for the switch, you can see how they would use the capacity for the switch.

Is that really a choice they had to make? Given the rate at which NES Classics were being stocked, I think they had a single boy hand carving them. Can't see that benefiting Switch production much.

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NES Classic Discontinued

by Cody Miller, Dinklebot - Never Forget, Friday, April 14, 2017, 15:40 (42 days ago) @ cheapLEY

Given the choice between manufacturing capacity for that or for the switch, you can see how they would use the capacity for the switch.


Is that really a choice they had to make? Given the rate at which NES Classics were being stocked, I think they had a single boy hand carving them. Can't see that benefiting Switch production much.

That is the point. They do not have the manufacturing capacity for tons of these. To get more would be a waste, since it could be used for the switch instead.

Not that surprising

by narcogen ⌂ @, Almaty, Kazakhstan, Friday, April 14, 2017, 22:36 (42 days ago) @ Cody Miller

Given the choice between manufacturing capacity for that or for the switch, you can see how they would use the capacity for the switch.


Is that really a choice they had to make? Given the rate at which NES Classics were being stocked, I think they had a single boy hand carving them. Can't see that benefiting Switch production much.


That is the point. They do not have the manufacturing capacity for tons of these. To get more would be a waste, since it could be used for the switch instead.

That sounds like nonsense to me. You buy as much manufacturing capacity as you want. Nothing in either the Switch nor the NES Classic is a part that constrains supply-- we're not talking about sapphire glass screens here, or custom graphics chips from the 8 and 16 bit eras, when Atari and Commodore dueled each other by literally purchasing chip fabbing capacity they did not need in order to deny it to the other.

If there's something Nintendo considers limited with regard to the Switch and the NES, it's mindshare. They didn't want the NES Classic overshadowing the Switch or competing with it for shelf space or customer attention. They were probably alarmed at how quickly and easily people were able to hack it to add arbitrary ROMs

http://www.polygon.com/2017/1/11/14237518/nes-classic-edition-hack-roms-nintendo

as well as how quickly it seemed to become apparent that they had themselves taken advantage of work done by the emulation community, despite them being very critical of that community

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2017-01-18-did-nintendo-download-a-mario-rom-and-sell...

There was also a good observation by a commenter over on the Jimquisition's editorial about the NES suggesting that it is just SOP for Japanese companies that promote items as limited and exclusive to actually stick to that definition, to manufacture a predetermined and specified number of an item, and then stop. This preserves the exclusive and limited nature of the product. It is worth remembering that Nintendo is a toy company, not a game company.

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Not that surprising

by Cody Miller, Dinklebot - Never Forget, Saturday, April 15, 2017, 08:16 (41 days ago) @ narcogen

Given the choice between manufacturing capacity for that or for the switch, you can see how they would use the capacity for the switch.


Is that really a choice they had to make? Given the rate at which NES Classics were being stocked, I think they had a single boy hand carving them. Can't see that benefiting Switch production much.


That is the point. They do not have the manufacturing capacity for tons of these. To get more would be a waste, since it could be used for the switch instead.


That sounds like nonsense to me. You buy as much manufacturing capacity as you want. Nothing in either the Switch nor the NES Classic is a part that constrains supply--

Actually it does. If you read the articles they literally cannot manufacture more NES classics fast enough. There are constraints on the manufacturing.

Everything else you mentioned are definitely compounding factors and part of the reason too.

False assumptions

by narcogen ⌂ @, Almaty, Kazakhstan, Saturday, April 15, 2017, 20:51 (41 days ago) @ Cody Miller

That sounds like nonsense to me. You buy as much manufacturing capacity as you want. Nothing in either the Switch nor the NES Classic is a part that constrains supply--


Actually it does. If you read the articles they literally cannot manufacture more NES classics fast enough. There are constraints on the manufacturing.

I have read no credible article that cites a reliable source indicating this, only speculation.

A Raspberry Pi can do this job better than the hardware they put in that thing.

Nintendo also just *ceased* production in Europe. Surely if Nintendo had a higher production target and could not meet it due to constraints or slowdowns, they would simply continue production until the target was hit, even after announcing that the product would be discontinued.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/insertcoin/2017/04/14/so-what-is-nintendo-thinking-discont...

"I can see Nintendo maybe wanting to stop for a while and play catch up, preparing for a grand re-release of the NES Classic Edition this holiday, only this time, they’ve taken the time to build up enough stock where it won’t be sold out everywhere all the time with massive production shortages. "

For instance, the above Forbes article mentions "production shortages" but nowhere cites any source for this information. I think the Western press just automatically assumes that when a popular product that is in high demand sees low supply, the obvious conclusion is production constraint. This fails to take into account the deliberate strategy, not of faking constrained supplies, which is common, but an actual deliberate constraint of making a product exclusive and limited.

It's conceivable that Nintendo had legitimate production issues that limited supply on consoles like the Wii. It is scarcely believable with respect to the NES Classic. Certainly production constraints do not explain why, for instance, Skylanders figurine sales are over 10x higher than amiibo sales. This is deliberate.

http://www.polygon.com/2016/11/11/13597938/nes-classic-edition-shortage


In fact, rumors of production being ceased (not troubled, constrained, or delayed, but ordered to stop) began as far back as February.

When complaints started last fall, Nintendo issued this statement:

"The Nintendo Entertainment System: NES Classic Edition system is a hot item, and we are working hard to keep up with consumer demand. There will be a steady flow of additional systems through the holiday shopping season and into the new year."

The "we are working hard" line is what all the Western press interprets to mean "production problems" because when a Western company says that, that's what it means. I do not think it means that in this case-- at least in part because of the later reference to "the holiday shopping season and into the new year". Not "until next holidays"-- but literally "into the new year". Meaning, until now, when we discontinue. The statement was carefully crafted to say that they would continue production until early this year, but no further.

The press interprets that as Nintendo hedging-- implying that they don't want to commit to anything further than early 2017. The assumption, though, is that if the product was popular and profitable, of course any reasonable company would continue making them until demand decreased. The presumption is that if they are not doing so, it must be because they are unable, not because they are unwilling.

I think with respect to Nintendo in general and the NES Classic in particular, this is a false assumption.

https://www.geek.com/games/is-nintendo-ending-production-of-the-nes-classic-mini-1688513/

Nintendo has a history of under-producing

by Kahzgul, Sunday, April 16, 2017, 08:50 (40 days ago) @ narcogen

Remember the Wii? Nintendo has a history of under-producing high demand products. I used to think this was to feed artificial scarcity into the market and drive sales, but I now wonder if they simply refuse to upgrade their manufacturing to realistic capacities.

Nintendo has a history of under-producing

by narcogen ⌂ @, Almaty, Kazakhstan, Sunday, April 16, 2017, 19:06 (40 days ago) @ Kahzgul

Remember the Wii? Nintendo has a history of under-producing high demand products. I used to think this was to feed artificial scarcity into the market and drive sales, but I now wonder if they simply refuse to upgrade their manufacturing to realistic capacities.

Nintendo consoles are made in China by Foxconn.

https://gamerant.com/wii-u-child-labor-nintendo-foxconn/

They aren't turning them out on the same machines they used to make karuta cards-- the manufacturing capacity Nintendo always had in Japan.

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NES Classic Discontinued

by ManKitten ⌂, Southern Indiana, Wednesday, April 19, 2017, 12:21 (37 days ago) @ Blackt1g3r

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