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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music (DBO)

by INSANEdrive, ಥ_ಥ | f(ಠ‿↼)z | ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ| ¯\_(ツ)_/¯, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 11:30 (1586 days ago)

I have recently found myself with time to just... think. It's been nice. One of the things I've been pondering about is music, why I like what I like and what not. I've lived long enough now that through my memories I can watch the journey I've had thus far of my musical taste. From the seeds planted by my parents own musical tastes, to now where a set of sounds can transport me in time as effectively as smell can. Not only transport but change a room, like some sort of shared psychosis. After all, it's not the room that has changed, but the people in it.

I know. This post is off the cuff here I... I wasn't planning this or anything, it's just I yet again find myself with simple curiosity and an outlet to ask of it. I mean, at worst, Funkmon will present us with an essay why the Polka is ultimate form of music or something. :P

So I'm just going to throw down some questions here, and see where this leads.
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  • What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?
  • How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?
  • Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?
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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Korny @, Dalton, Ga. US. Earth, Sol System, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 11:57 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

I have recently found myself with time to just... think. It's been nice. One of the things I've been pondering about is music, why I like what I like and what not. I've lived long enough now that through my memories I can watch the journey I've had thus far of my musical taste. From the seeds planted by my parents own musical tastes, to now where a set of sounds can transport me in time as effectively as smell can. Not only transport but change a room, like some sort of shared psychosis. After all, it's not the room that has changed, but the people in it.

I know. This post is off the cuff here I... I wasn't planning this or anything, it's just I yet again find myself with simple curiosity and an outlet to ask of it. I mean, at worst, Funkmon will present us with an essay why the Polka is ultimate form of music or something. :P

So I'm just going to throw down some questions here, and see where this leads.
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  • What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?

This is kind of a loaded question. I mean, Music can entertain me, like Neil Cicierega's "Wndrwll", or it can simply make me feel stuff, like any of Chopin's music, with something as simple as "Prelude, (Op.28, No.4) in E Minor" being among my favorite music... I don't look for anything particular in music, it just comes down to hearing something, and enjoying it for whatever reason. There's a lot of music that I dislike at first, but something about it clicks for me, and I listen to it again and again, until I love the song(s) and/or artist (Warpaint, one of my now-favorite bands, was like this for me).

[*]How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?

I think a lot of what has affected my taste in music has more to do with a band's evolution over the years more than anything. Growing up, I loved artists like Korn and Eminem. But pretty much everything that both made after the mid-2000s has been fairly terrible, so I just flat-out stopped following them.
On the other hand, an artist like Chris Corner changed from the trip-hop band Sneaker Pimps, the goth-y IAMX, and I loved the change. So while I love both styles (and really miss getting new SP stuff), it's opened up a bit of a genre that I would never listen to otherwise (and I've tried since).
And then as you grow up, you realize how terrible a lot of music was (Smash Mouth, Limp Bzkit), and you can appreciate that with a sense of humor. My brother and I make tons of Linkin Park jokes through lyrics to torture Sammy (who loved them growing up), and it helps that we have much of their discography memorized. But we do also play a lot of that music unironically, for nostalgia's sake and all that.

[*]Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?
[/list]

I played Trombone for four years in school, does that count? :P
I was alright, but this one time, at band camp...

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Harmanimus @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 19:22 (1586 days ago) @ Korny

But we do also play a lot of that music unironically, for nostalgia's sake and all that.

That is because their entire discography after Hybrid Theory is spectacular and grotesquely under appreciated.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 21:38 (1585 days ago) @ Harmanimus

That is because their entire discography after Hybrid Theory is spectacular and grotesquely under appreciated.

One of these days I should go back and see about that. They really fell off my radar after Meteora. I vaguely remember listening to... whatever their next album was called, and not really getting it. BUT, I don't actually remember enough specifics about what I didn't like, or whether I'd like it now. And I definitely have a better appreciation for music now. So, who knows? When Chester died recently I remembered how much their early stuff meant to me and felt a little bad that younger me might not have given the rest of it a chance.

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Linkin Park and the evolution of sound

by Harmanimus @, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 00:06 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

Minutes to Midnight is such a different album from what Linkin Park put out before it, but also shows one more step in their rapid change and response to the cultural and musical environments they found themselves in with each release (to include Reanimation [Actually my first Linkin Park album beeteedubs] and Collision Course released up to that point).

Minutes to Midnight was a lot grittier, where Hybrid Theory was more clearly defined by rough guitar and percussive songs (not counting Cure For The Itch) being an obvious blending of hip-hop into a metal derived sound and Meteora embraced and brought forward the more electronic background that Hybrid theory had. Hybrid Theory to Meteora was a linear progression that made sense. Minutes to Midnight? Not so much. The album is more distinctly political than their prior releases, too. (It also came out the same year Nine Inch Nails put out Year Zero which was also uncharacteristically political.) A lot of folks really fell off with LP at that point. Whether because they were "selling out" or what not. I would say they were growing. And they've kept growing and each album has its own charms.

Also, Mike Shinoda brought a lot of the feeling of his interim work on Fort Minor with him into Minutes to Midnight and you that extra visceral tone was in stark contrast to what a lot of people were expecting from a new LP album at the time. I was disappointed when I first got the album. It was the spec. ed., too. But it grew on me fast.

We listened to the entire discography, by release date, when we heard about his passing in my office. No work got done for like three days. Illustrative of how influential some music can be to folks.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Ragashingo ⌂ @, Official DBO Cryptarch, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 12:23 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive
edited by Ragashingo, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 12:58

Hmm. Music to me is not what it is to other people. Mostly in the sense that I like what I like and I’m not super eager to seek out anything new. I have roughly 2,500 songs, but I tend to like some Country and some rock, as seen here:

[image] [image]

[image] [image]

But, for the last few years I have collected Anime openings and songs and listen them... for just about everything... all the time. Having songs in a language I can’t understand makes it easy to concentrate on work, for instance.

[image] [image] [image] [image] [image] [image] [image][image]

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Music Suggestion

by INSANEdrive, ಥ_ಥ | f(ಠ‿↼)z | ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ| ¯\_(ツ)_/¯, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 19:22 (1586 days ago) @ Ragashingo

Hmm. Music to me is not what it is to other people. Mostly in the sense that I like what I like and I’m not super eager to seek out anything new. I have roughly 2,500 songs, but I tend to like some Country and some rock, as seen here...

But, for the last few years I have collected Anime openings and songs and listen them... for just about everything... all the time. Having songs in a language I can’t understand makes it easy to concentrate on work, for instance.

[image]

------------------------------------

I see a few in your list, but I have to say - Yoko Kanno.

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Music Suggestion

by Ragashingo ⌂ @, Official DBO Cryptarch, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 20:19 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive
edited by Ragashingo, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 20:23

Oh, of course. Most notably, for me anyways, is all the music of Macross Frontier. So a full 1/4th of what I listen to on a regular basis is her!

And, of course, there’s Cowboy Bebop (which I strangely don’t have any music from at the moment.) The reason I don’t have even more from her is either I havne’t watched a show yet, or I have and didn’t particularly like it. (I’m, lookin’ at you Escaflowne and Aquarion...)

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I don't really like music: to be continued.

by Funkmon @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 12:53 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

That being said, I have 70,000 songs in my music library. Why? I don't know. I only listen to a couple albums at a time.

I also play guitar, mandolin, ukulele, and bad piano. I'm bad at them and only use them to play my fave songs.

I have about $1000 in records. Why? Not sure. The albums I love I try to get on vinyl, so, on the rare occasion I listen to them, it's fun.

My musical tastes are nearly unchanged from when I was a kid. I liked ska, I liked pop/punk, I liked power pop, I liked hair metal, I liked non prog rock from the 60s and 70s, I liked lighter metal (no heavier than Pantera).

I still like all these things. I continue to listen to pop/punk most, and when I venture out of that genre, it's usually out of loyalty to the artist. See for example We Are The In Crowd, a poppy pop punk band, and now SAINTE, a spin off that's synthpop/rock, which I normally hate. https://youtu.be/970Fq3d855E --> https://youtu.be/aImYc9AFbOE

I'll have to continue this in a few hours.

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I don't really like music: to be continued.

by Revenant1988 ⌂ @, How do I forum?, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 14:43 (1586 days ago) @ Funkmon

That being said, I have 70,000 songs in my music library. Why? I don't know. I only listen to a couple albums at a time.

I also play guitar, mandolin, ukulele, and bad piano. I'm bad at them and only use them to play my fave songs.

Based on the above, how could you not?

That's like me saying "I don't really like gaming, but I own a PS4, Xbox, Nintendo, Dreamcast".

Are you just trying to be edgy, or sumthin?

"I don't really like music"

[image]

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I don't really like music: to be continued.

by Funkmon @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 19:12 (1586 days ago) @ Revenant1988
edited by Funkmon, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 19:16

I don't really like music. I don't listen to it often, maybe once a month outside the 5 albums I have in my car, which I listen to once a week maybe, and I haven't opened my iTunes library since February. It's boring. The only reason I've picked up the guitar in a year is to give this guy lessons.

You can easily own a bunch of game systems and not like video games. You may just play TLOU and Halo, then quit. That's basically what I do. I apprehend music I believe I would like and then never listen to it because I don't really like music.

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For what do I look in music? Plus the 5 best songs ever.

by Funkmon @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 23:11 (1586 days ago) @ Funkmon
edited by Funkmon, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 23:14

Something to occupy my mind. The music itself doesn't usually do this, but the lyrics do. Sometimes they can be vapid, but have a meaning to you, or just be fun.

For example, due to my artist loyalty, I'm always good for plowing through a whole new album a few times to give all the songs a fair shake.

For example, with Jennifer Rostock, a female fronted electro rap metal group from Germany, they have this power ballady song called "Insekten im Eis," which, if you buy into the premise of insects being trapped in ice, is a fantastic piece of music describing what it feels like to be in a romance that's going nowhere and isn't fulfilling. It has this line that translates to something like "and the talk became brittle like withered leaves," when describing how the relationship is going. Whoa.

But K.B.A.G by Jennifer Rostock isn't interesting or have a connection to my life. It's about being a band that can't really hit it big and touring and staying up all night and smoking and drinking...but it's fun.

So I like those.

But for me to like the lyrics to the song, the rest of the music has to fit with what I like so I can handle it. No rap junk, no pop, no disco. Give me simple guitar driven chord progression and a whiny singer to say stuff I like.

But by and large, I just stick to the bands I enjoy, listen to their album a few times, and then when the next one comes out, I listen to that.

The artist loyalty is easier to maintain if you just stick with liking the lyrics and basic structure of some songs. It allows me to be a fan of Butch Walker from his hair metal days in Southgang, to weird indie alternative with Floyd's Funk Revival, to the power pop, Glam and punkishness of Marvelous 3 and his early albums, to his country rock of Stay Gold. He has this way with the lyrics and the song structures where, even though he changes genres, I still like the music. Same with Bon Jovi. I like every single Bon Jovi record from the hair metal to their current crap. Top tier band. They just make songs that work for me, even splitting genres.

Now, because I want music to occupy my mind, unless I am in a mood to express feelings, I don't turn on music. I can't listen to it in the background: I get too involved in it and it ruins what I'm doing, and even then, it's totally boring.

In a car I can do it, and do do it, usually for drives longer than an hour, because of how little attention driving really takes.

This is why I'm constantly listening to audiobooks or baseball or Radio 4. I need something there to occupy my mind, and music by and large is too boring to do so, again, unless I want it as an outlet for my feelings.

So, I don't really like listening to music. I want it to be lame structurally so I can pay attention to the lyrics. I can't get much out of the lyrics unless I'm in a particular mood. In much the same way a person might have to be in the mood for liverwurst, I have to be in the mood for music.

Anyway, the greatest song ever written is Yesterday by The Beatles, followed by Fight The Good Fight by Triumph, followed by Breathe by Michelle Branch, Who Says You Can't Go Home by Bon Jovi, and Funeral For A Friend/Love Lies Bleeding by Elton John in no particular order. Don't listen to these unless you're legit curious.

Regarding the double song Funeral for a Friend/Love Lies Bleeding, that's not only one of the best songs ever written, it's the first track on the album. I play it for people very occasionally. I put it on and it starts quiet. You hear the dirge, and then it goes into one of the most energetic transitions this side of Live Bullet, and then Love Lies Bleeding starts with a beast of a line. The roses in the window box / have tilted to one side / everything about this house / was born to grow and die.

Holy crap what a line. Bernie was a genius. What an album, too. Some time on XBL ask me why my girlfriend hates that record.

Anyway the rest of the top 10 are probably all on Jagged Little Pill.

Tell us about YOUR music, insanedrive.

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Breathe isn't even the best song on Hotel Paper.

by Harmanimus @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 23:53 (1586 days ago) @ Funkmon

- No text -

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I wish you weren't a liar.

by Funkmon @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 00:15 (1586 days ago) @ Harmanimus

- No text -

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Breathe isn't even the best song on Hotel Paper.

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 07:56 (1585 days ago) @ Harmanimus

Can I ask what is, in your opinion? I actually used to listen to that album a lot but it's been a LONG time.

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Breathe isn't even the best song on Hotel Paper.

by Harmanimus @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 09:36 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

That is a much more difficult question than it should be. Noting that Breathe isn’t the best on tha album is easy (I would put it in the bottom half of the album [not thay being lower on such a solid album is really that bad a thing]) but there is a lot of competition for top slot.

Withhtout further quantification or clarification: Tuesday Morning

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Breathe isn't even the best song on Hotel Paper.

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 09:52 (1585 days ago) @ Harmanimus

Gave it a listen just now and I can buy that.

I wonder if anyone else out there in the world is alternating between Michelle Branch and Refused right now?

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Vortech @, A Fourth Wheel, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 13:34 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

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  • What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?
  • How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?
  • Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?

I like almost all genres, which is a very different statement than saying I like almost all music. I am the person musicians love to hate in that I have little use for albums since I will probably only like 1-2 songs from it. (And rarely the one that gets airplay, or top singles sales). This means it's easier — though obviously less informative — to say what I don't like. There are a couple generous that I have yet to find anything I want to hear: Thrash/speed metal; trap music; VERY rarely have I heard a reggae song I like.

Except for odd times on weekends when they get too deep into a genere, the current.org is uncannily able to queue up music that I like. You could essentially use their playlists as a window into my taste, or you could follow me on Apple Music, should you have that.

There are two major saltation points in my musical taste. First, as I child we only had Christian music. Whatever that genre might mean now, I mean it as what they might sell at a christian book store in the mid 80's. At some point — right about the time I got a gift of a CD player, so lets say 1987 or 88 — I started owning more mainstream music. I started listening to non-christian Radio, but usually the Oldies Station, and then the Classic Rock station.

The next was when I discovered Soundtracks. This here, was a much more viable value proposition than buying an album and liking 1-2 songs, but it also came with the benefit of having a point of view that would cut across multiple artists, and even multiple genres.

Next, I matriculated at the same time as the rise of limewire/napster/iTunes local network music sharing. This was the first broadband Connection to the internet I had ever had, and the first time I could digitally collect songs, re-arange them into my own mix, and burn my own CDs. Tons of music that I "Knew" but never knew by name or artist was something I learned because I started trying to build a library. This, again, was important to me because I could get just the small percentage of stuff I wanted, but not the stuff I didn't. That translated easily into legal purchases when they opened the iTunes Music Store, since it was not that fact that it was free, necicarially, it was because I could select individual songs — not worry about how rare they were — and preview them before I bought them. Again the value proposition changed enough that I could really start cultivating.

Finally, when self-publishing became democratized and smaller more indie radio stations started streaming online that modernized the personal programming stuff I was getting from soundtracks, but will lead of a need to be commercially viable.

I can play a Rock Band controller. Poorly.

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Challenge accepted

by Funkmon @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 23:40 (1586 days ago) @ Vortech

Surely you enjoy the second greatest thrash metal song of all time!

And the greatest

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This is exactly like when I tell people I don't like beer.

by Vortech @, A Fourth Wheel, Monday, April 09, 2018, 07:28 (1585 days ago) @ Funkmon

- No text -

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lol

by CruelLEGACEY @, Toronto, Monday, April 09, 2018, 07:33 (1585 days ago) @ Vortech

- No text -

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Your fault

by Funkmon @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 11:04 (1585 days ago) @ Vortech

You said you've never heard a thrash metal song you liked or something like that. If you said you didn't like thrash metal, I'd have moved on.

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Your fault

by Vortech @, A Fourth Wheel, Monday, April 09, 2018, 12:06 (1585 days ago) @ Funkmon

Oh, much like the beer I'll try it (but unlike beer I'll wait till I'm not at work.).

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‘Fraid not.

by Vortech @, A Fourth Wheel, Thursday, April 19, 2018, 16:19 (1575 days ago) @ Funkmon

- No text -

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Revenant1988 ⌂ @, How do I forum?, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 14:37 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive
edited by Revenant1988, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 14:50

I have recently found myself with time to just... think. It's been nice. One of the things I've been pondering about is music, why I like what I like and what not. I've lived long enough now that through my memories I can watch the journey I've had thus far of my musical taste. From the seeds planted by my parents own musical tastes, to now where a set of sounds can transport me in time as effectively as smell can. Not only transport but change a room, like some sort of shared psychosis. After all, it's not the room that has changed, but the people in it.

I know. This post is off the cuff here I... I wasn't planning this or anything, it's just I yet again find myself with simple curiosity and an outlet to ask of it. I mean, at worst, Funkmon will present us with an essay why the Polka is ultimate form of music or something. :P

So I'm just going to throw down some questions here, and see where this leads.
------------------------------------------------------

  • What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?

Music is mostly something I use to unwind and relax with. I found early on that Heavy Metal was the genre for me, but that also naturally spreads out to classic rock, grunge, industrial etc. Beyond that, I don't really deviate. You won't find hip-hop, country or pop music in my library. Some people in my preferred choice can be metal snobs, but I like a spectrum of metal.

I love my music, I love it played live and it just really soothes my soul. Sometimes it's the lyrics, other times the riff or groove, or a combination of all of it.

The subject matter could be serious, political, or satire\parody or just fun.

My absolute favorites are anything with a great harmony of guitars, and\or vocals and anything where I can just get lost in the reverberations, when it's heavy, crunchy. You know when that dude in his car pulls up next to yours with his bass cranked up and it sounds like ass? I don't like that. It drowns out the rest of the mix. I want to feel it all.

Doesn't have to be English either, could be German or nordic. A couple Megadeth songs I like are in French and Spanish too. I love how music itself is it's own language.

[*]How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?

For the most part, it's stayed pretty contained to the genre, but with a few mutations. One thing I found years ago I liked is Metal mixed with classical instruments. A good, mainstream example of this would be Metallica playing with the San Francisco Orchestra. Otherwise, this niche is hard to find...

But I also really like Grunge, especially Alice and Chains, which started out metal, then evolved over time.

When I met Paddy (a fellow HBO\DBOer) a few years back, he got me more into classic Metal, bands like Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, Black Sabbath, Ronnie James Dio and now they are regularly in my line up. On that same token, I introduced him to Thrash metal (my fav) with bands like Anthrax, Megadeth, Slayer and Suicidal Tendencies.

So in my case, not much has really changed, so much as I've started to trace the roots of bands that influenced bands I like, and kept me firmly in that family-tree, so to speak.

[*]Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?
[/list]

Nope, unless you want to count the recorder in 4th grade, or guitar hero. I have sang before with my friends shitty garage\cover band. Unfortunately, the songs I'm actually GOOD at you aren't likely to find in a Karaoke line up :P


I really like this youtube channelwhere a couple of guys who aren't heavy metal listeners, react to various songs for the first time.

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Symphonic Metal, hard to find?????

by Harmanimus @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 19:31 (1586 days ago) @ Revenant1988

- No text -

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by kidtsunami @, Atlanta, GA, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 17:07 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

I have recently found myself with time to just... think. It's been nice. One of the things I've been pondering about is music, why I like what I like and what not. I've lived long enough now that through my memories I can watch the journey I've had thus far of my musical taste. From the seeds planted by my parents own musical tastes, to now where a set of sounds can transport me in time as effectively as smell can. Not only transport but change a room, like some sort of shared psychosis. After all, it's not the room that has changed, but the people in it.

I know. This post is off the cuff here I... I wasn't planning this or anything, it's just I yet again find myself with simple curiosity and an outlet to ask of it. I mean, at worst, Funkmon will present us with an essay why the Polka is ultimate form of music or something. :P

So I'm just going to throw down some questions here, and see where this leads.
------------------------------------------------------

  • What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?

Depends on what I'm doing. Since I spend most of my time coding, I want something that works into the back of my head as I focus on the work at hand. I don't want it to be necessarily super atmospheric, just not something that punches into the front of my thoughts. A lot of soundtracks...

[*]How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?

As a teenager I listened to a lot of straight edge hardcore, mostly the DC/Boston variety. Though at the same time I enjoyed a wide variety of jams from Paul Simon's graceland to El-P's Fantastic Damage. By college I was listening to almost exclusively post-rock, mainly Explosions in the Sky. I'm now in my 30s and I'm listening to more post-rock, ambient, whatever spotify's algorithm spews out. I occasionally sit down and give a random Tool album a proper listen to. Oh and I have a Refused The Shape Of Punk To Come album in DVD-Audio 5.1 that is essential listening.

[*]Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?

I played Clarinet, Contra-Alto E-Flat Clarinet in Orchestra, and Cymbals in the drumline. I was ok, I took some music theory on top of my comp sci degree but have made nothing of it and would likely take a lot of time to pick any instrument up at this point. If I have kids and then end up playing something, I'll probably pick up a complimentary instrument for the jollies.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 08:10 (1585 days ago) @ kidtsunami

Oh and I have a Refused The Shape Of Punk To Come album in DVD-Audio 5.1 that is essential listening.

Ack, I've been meaning to pick that album up for forever. I currently know almost nothing of it, but it's been referenced by enough artists/people in the industry who I respect that I thought I should check it out.

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Oooh, this fun. (Warning: Lots of embedded videos).

by cheapLEY @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 18:48 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?

Anything and everything. Music is extremely important to me. I'd give up any other form of entertainment before I gave up music. Books, movies, games, television . . . it all pales in comparison to music for me. I spend a bunch of my free time in the evenings just listening to music. If I'm not doing something like playing a game or watching a movie, something that requires my full attention, I have music playing.

[*]How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?

My tastes have changed drastically. As an angsty teen, I listened to a bunch of emo and post-hardcore stuff. Lots of screamo. I rejected pop music on its face, and if it was played on the radio, I probably hated it. Now, I'm much more open and listen to a wide variety of genres, and some of my favorite stuff (Have I mentioned how great Taylor Swift is?) is stuff I wold have outright rejected in the past.

Music discovery is something I devote a lot of time to. Spotify has been incredible for that, and beats the hell out of the old days of trolling MySpace (and then, later, YouTube). I listen to my Discovery Weekly playlist on Spotify (a playlist the algorithms create every Monday to feed you 30 new songs). I'm not really sure how the algorithm works, what it's parameters are, etc, but I like more songs it feeds me than I dislike, so it works well for me.

[*]Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?
[/list]

No. Always wanted to learn the guitar or piano, but I'm just not willing to dedicate the time.

Now, I'll provide a sample of my current favorite stuff, because I love sharing and talking about music, and also I'm just self-indulgent.

Brand New has been one of my favorite bands since middle school. Every album they put out is completely different from the last, and they're all good. They put out a new one last year (probably their last) and it's incredible, called Science Fiction. It's an interesting album, in that it's different from all their others, but it still feels like a culmination of everything they've done before--there are echoes of every previous album in there.

I legitimately spent 30 minutes previewing songs to decide which one to post. This one isn't my favorite, but it is the opening of the album, and it sets the tone well.

Closely related to Brand New is Manchester Orchestra, which, if pushed, I would have to say is my favorite band. Like Brand New, every one of their albums sounds completely different from the last. They also put out a new record last year (A Black Mile to the Surface), and it's the best thing they've ever done. This record feels like a real turning point for the band, to me.

Here's my favorite song from that album:

And here's the song that got me into them, and a music video I love for reasons that should be obvious.

Julien Baker is rising on my personal list of favorites.

Pianos Become the Teeth is also great.

The World is a Beautiful Place & I Am No Longer Afraid to Die is leading the charge of emo revival (or maybe post-emo, I dunno), and their record Harmlessness is one of my favorite albums ever.

JYOCHO is my current obsession. This is what I put on when I just want to sort of zone out and relax.

I got really into post-rock and all its sub-genres and sort of related genres within the past five or six years or so.

It started with Fang Island.

And progressed to And So I Watched You From Afar, who put on what might be the best live show I've ever seen (in some tiny dive bar in the Castro district in San Francisco). That then moved into the typical Explosions in the Sky, Caspian, mogwai, Russian Circles, 65daysofstatic, etc.

I could do this forever, but you're all bored to death by now, I'm sure.

I'd be remiss if I didn't post the pop star that is competing with Taylor Swift for me, though.

If anyone made it this far and is interested, here's a link to a few of my Spotify playlists. They are the results of my Discover Weekly songs. If I like a song from Discover Weekly, I add it to a Discovered [Current Year] playlist. At the end of the year, I add that playlist to a huge Discovered Past playlist and start a new one for the new year. Attempts to further organize those songs into smaller playlists are incomplete.

Discovered 2018

Discovered Past Years

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Bye.

by INSANEdrive, ಥ_ಥ | f(ಠ‿↼)z | ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ| ¯\_(ツ)_/¯, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 19:27 (1586 days ago) @ cheapLEY

Music discovery is something I devote a lot of time to. Spotify has been incredible for that, and beats the hell out of the old days of trolling MySpace (and then, later, YouTube). I listen to my Discovery Weekly playlist on Spotify (a playlist the algorithms create every Monday to feed you 30 new songs). I'm not really sure how the algorithm works, what it's parameters are, etc, but I like more songs it feeds me than I dislike, so it works well for me.


It's been nice knowing you and stuff.

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Indeed.

by cheapLEY @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 19:56 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

Thanks! That's legitimately awesome, and now I'll be up entirely too late tonight.

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Down the rabbit hole.

by Harmanimus @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 19:19 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

So, I've always been one of the music is life people. And while I take pride in it, my taste is usually best described as "stupid eclectic." With that:

What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?

I look for something emotive first and foremost. Regardless of what that feeling is. This make it really easy to separate music I won't like, because usually the evocation is disgust or something in that realm. The purpose is about as varied as my tastes. Often I use it to reinforce a way I'm feeling, or to nullify the same. I listen to a lot of things at work or with the purpose of accenting activities. I also have no shame, not that most of the listed following would probably offend anyone here, but I work in a secure room sometimes, no RF in or out. No recording devices, etc. So I have a briefcase record player and vinyl in there, the selection? As follows, alphabetically:

Chvrches - Every Open Eye
Chvrches - The Bones Of What You Believe
Godspeed You! Black Emperor - F# A# (Infinity)
Godspeed You! Black Emperor - Yanqui U.X.O.
Guardians of the Galaxy Awesome Mix Vol 1, 2 (Deluxe)
Gustav Holst - The Planets (Full Suite)
Lorde - Pure Heroine
Neutral Milk Hotel - In The Aeroplane Over The Sea
Purity Ring - another eternity
Purity Ring - Shrines
Sisters Of Mercy - Floodland
Taylor Swift - 1989
twenty one pilots - Blurryface

Along with various albums of classic standards, ballets, etc. And this list continues to grow. I need to pick up additional copies of John Carpenter's stuff to take in. My home collection is mostly limited edition and vintage stuff. I don't own a record player for my home. That is part of a joke. Still, only touching surface layers, though. I know every word to Michelle Branch's The Spirit Room. I have stopped a conversation to educate someone when I was listening to Orgy and they mused, "Ahh, Marilyn Manson," simply because they were doing me a boggle.

How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?

It just grows. Formative years in music taste tend to leave some latent appreciation from childhood exposure in people, but someones personal taste is often codified by what they liked at around 16. This is usually when people find things that are not introduced by their parents/older siblings/etc. and so the formation is more internalized.

So yeah, my tastes have changed in many regards, but I haven't lost my appreciations for things. The things I grew up on via parents, et al. (Queen, Tom Petty, Journey [Really any Hair Metal - Dokken made up my lullabies as an infant], Pearl Jam [Most of Grunge, my parents grew up adjacent to Cobain], Bob Marley, etc. and the list never ends) or tastes that I gained on my own or had introductions through siblings (Foo Fighters, Liz Phair, White/Rob Zombie, Ministry, Pretty Girls Make Graves, Tegan and Sara, AFI) have all held steadfast in my listening repertoire. But even more recent selections have made pretty substantial impacts on my modern listening (Mick Gordon, Meg Myers, Ghost, Magic Sword) and are just as likely to show up on my speakers.

There is pretty much no genre I dislike as a whole. I almost always have an example of something worthwhile. And usually have ample listening suggestions for folks.

Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?

I have. I do not. I was (mostly) not. I used The Chocobo Song to try to get a solo part in middle school. I would like to pick up ukulele and harmonica, for reasons.

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Down the rabbit hole.

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 08:58 (1585 days ago) @ Harmanimus
edited by stabbim, Monday, April 09, 2018, 09:01

Lorde - Pure Heroine

I fully believe this album is a modern masterpiece. I was a little late to the Lorde party - I don't really keep up on what's current/popular (outside of my current avatar, anyway) so I didn't hear of her until like 2015. But I'm 100% into it now - I actually saw her live just a couple of weeks ago.

BTW Lorde is an NMH fan. I saw her tweet lyrics from Two-Headed Boy once. :)

Neutral Milk Hotel - In The Aeroplane Over The Sea

Yes. Yesyesyes. This album's every bit as good as all your favorite music snobs say it is. Like a lot of people, I suspect, I didn't hear about it until well after Jeff Mangum had gone off the grid. But I did hear about it in time to be invested in the whole mythos, so I could get PROPERLY excited when he came back and started touring again. I saw him back in 2012, solo show at a small venue in Ames, Iowa.

Little anecdote from that show: The venue had noted online and put up signs saying that we should all stay seated during the show, and not come up to the stage - presumably to avoid scaring Jeff back to his cabin in the woods, LOL. But the guy playing the opening act told us to never mind that, it was OK to come up there and actually Jeff would be fine with it. That guy was Julian Koster, also a member of NMH, so we all understood that he knew Jeff personally and we could take him at his word. So everyone got up and stood right by the stage for the whole show. It was magical.

Taylor Swift - 1989

Are you and I actually the same person? I could go on forever about this album, but all I'll say is that it is legitimately one of the best albums I've ever heard, and that is coming from someone who used to say that he "doesn't listen to popular music." Ugh I was such a shit. I think what I really meant back then was that I didn't like music that wasn't real - the kind of thing that's written by one person or group, and then someone else puts their name on it. And say what you will about Taylor, but she is absolutely the architect and driving force behind her own music.

twenty one pilots - Blurryface

Another artist I was late to the party on. I actually should shout out Korny and Sammy here - between them and the lead singer of my favorite band constantly pushing twenty one pilots, I did finally check them out and am now majorly on the bandwagon. Saw them live during the Blurryface era, and that was sure an experience. When I'm old, I'll tell young people about the time that I saw Josh Dunn ride in a hamster ball across a crowd in Omaha.

Also, props for AFI. I still say that Sing The Sorrow is one of the best albums ever recorded. It NEVER loses momentum for a second, the whole way through. There's no pointless meandering, and IMO no "skip tracks."

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Down the rabbit hole.

by Harmanimus @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 10:58 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

re: Lorde

I got caught up when Royals hit Seattle, where I was spending too much time commuting at the time. Living in Kent but working in Everett is a special sort of hell. But the album is great. I was impressed with her assemblage of the Hunger Games soundtrack stuff. Yellow Flicker Beat is alright (the Kanye West rework is a whole other level, though) and I haven’t gotten around to her follow up album. My understanding is it is a narrative/concept album, so I have to find time to devote to it that I haven’t.

re: In The Aeroplane Over The Sea

King Of Carrot Flowers is under appreciated. Very influential on me in the early Aughts. But that album has definitely had a lasting effect. I was introduced right around his exit timeframe. But yeah. It is definitely one of those albums that lives up to the hype.

re: TSwift

No, probably not the same person. Other than 1989 I’m pretty middling on most of her discography. But that album is spectacular. My general feelings on pop music are likely in stark contrast, mostly becuase there is a broad selection of very different brands of pop, and even some that are so g-by-committee can produce great music. I’ll give you that there is a plus to music that “feels real” but I don’t think that necessarily requires someone to play “singer/songwriter” for it to feel real.

re: twenty one pilots

I didn’t really get into them when I was first exposed. It took a lot of recurrent experiences for them to catch on. But Blurryface did really start to grow on me on repeat listenings with folks who drank the kool-aid early. 10 Second Songs does a cover of Heathens in the style of Type O Negative which is crisp af.

re: AFI

I was introduced to them briefly with All Hallows EP/The Art of Drowning when I was first stretching my wings into less mainstream punk, jumping off from Minor Threat and Fugazi. But Sing the Sorrow is definitely when it clicked. AFI’s continued evolution still produces amazing stuff, though. Burials and the recently released Blood Album are both spectacular and identifiably AFI but bring their own identity.

Speaking of, though, basically everything Davey Havok touches is golden. Blaqk Audio, XTRMST, and Dreamcar are all great in their own right and identities.

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Down the rabbit hole.

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 12:53 (1585 days ago) @ Harmanimus
edited by stabbim, Monday, April 09, 2018, 13:01

re: Lorde

My understanding is it is a narrative/concept album

Interesting. I never thought of it as one, any more than any other album influenced by a breakup/coming-of-age time period. Although she has said the majority of it is about one specific house party, so I guess you could think of it that way.

re: TSwift

even some that are so g-by-committee can produce great music. I’ll give you that there is a plus to music that “feels real” but I don’t think that necessarily requires someone to play “singer/songwriter” for it to feel real.

There's definitely a huge grey area there for me. Some things are clearly too far towards the artificial side for me to stomach, others are less clear. Actually one of the first singers I ever got into when I was younger (I'll try to touch on the specifics if I ever get around to writing up my own thoughts) never wrote any of his own stuff as far as I know. That was before I really had any opinion on the subject, or even any knowledge of how music was made in the first place. But I appreciate that certain people who operate in a segment of the industry where everything's assumed to be manufactured (not always rightly) and thus COULD get away with it, don't do so.

re: AFI

I was introduced to them briefly with All Hallows EP/The Art of Drowning when I was first stretching my wings into less mainstream punk, jumping off from Minor Threat and Fugazi. But Sing the Sorrow is definitely when it clicked. AFI’s continued evolution still produces amazing stuff, though. Burials and the recently released Blood Album are both spectacular and identifiably AFI but bring their own identity.

Speaking of, though, basically everything Davey Havok touches is golden. Blaqk Audio, XTRMST, and Dreamcar are all great in their own right and identities.

Something I don't feel good about is that I didn't do a good job keeping up with AFI. Actually I didn't do ANY job of it at all. I was really into them in college, and then totally failed to keep up with anything they put out afterward (a big problem I have is music discovery/keeping up with new stuff - I need to touch on that too, probably). So my knowledge of them drops off somewhere around 2005. One of these days I'll catch up (is what I keep telling myself about that, and really ALL music).

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Down the rabbit hole.

by Funkmon @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 22:52 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

You're probably not missing much with AFI. They're still great, but in my experience, that genre of music is one of those from which you can easily drift away, and going back, it rarely has the same effect it once did. I believe AFI, despite their evolution as a band, require you to kind of move with them. I don't think you'll enjoy going back so much.

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Down the rabbit hole.

by Harmanimus @, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 00:19 (1585 days ago) @ Funkmon

I wouldn't necessarily agree with that. I can see having mixed feelings with December Underground (Industrial Dance/Futurepop was making enough waves that Ronan Harris of VNV Nation [The most influential band on 17 year old me] was involved) and disliking Crash Love - it being a generally pretty straight alt rock album - if you were in it for the Goth-Influenced Punk of Sing the Sorrow. But both Burials and The Blood Album fall near enough that it's worth giving them a fair attempt.

If you really wanna tell me that The Sinking Night or Still A Stranger, etc. wouldn't be right at home during the Sing The Sorrow era then I just don't know. Not to be confrontational, though, just they pluck at the same emotional strings for pretty much everyone I know.

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Meh. You're probably right.

by Funkmon @, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 00:24 (1585 days ago) @ Harmanimus

- No text -

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Yeah, but no one /really/ likes Crash Love.

by Harmanimus @, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 00:37 (1585 days ago) @ Funkmon

So if you try to simply catch up chronologically it is a kick in the teeth and you're probably right about the experience, too.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music (Embed Vids)

by INSANEdrive, ಥ_ಥ | f(ಠ‿↼)z | ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ| ¯\_(ツ)_/¯, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 21:35 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive
edited by INSANEdrive, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 22:30

Thanks for your replies all!
------------------------------------------------------

  • What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?

There is a lot of music out there. So I have to filter out what it is I listen to regularly to prove it's worth. My current method for music starts by not listening to it. Sort of odd right? But this isn't the Funkmon method towards music (;P), as my meaning is of mental participation. It has to pluck at my head to be recognized. I'll turn on some continually playing playlist of things and just read, and if it resonates with my head, I'll feel it and I'll note of the name if I can. After that, the music has to prove that I'll still like it a month or so after I have heard it.

I love music, in part because there are so many uses for it. It's can assist with focusing on a task at work, use it to lounge and add to the little things, or occasionally I'll just dance.

Music is the a seasoning of a moment. What's not to like?

  • How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?

Starting out, there was alot of Classical as that was all I really knew. I wasn't yet curious nor aware about music yet. If it was on, I probably enjoyed it. Whatever. Around me there was a verity of music being played. Love songs as a certain family relative loved this announcers (DJ?) voice and would help with sleep. There was also alot of Billy Joel and Kenny Loggins. Smooth Jazz too. I recall really liking the song "We didn't Start the Fire". I didn't understand a word being said, so I just thought it was catchy. Boy - the difference a fairly vast knowledge of history makes.

Any who the first time I really started to note what I enjoyed or preferred happened by accident. It was late October of whenever. It was an ad for some CD. The music on it was... different. Unlike anything I had ever heard before.

I don't recall exactly what the name of the CD was or really what the songs were on it except for one; Tubular bells. It was a complication of songs... and I think it was this.

I never did get that CD. I remember being in a Halloween shop, and I saw the CD, but I had use my allowance to get it. It was $99.99. I wanted to, and I could have, but I didn't. Dad was proud.

The damage was done though, those sounds stayed with me as I grew to understand music and what it was.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
^- Then - History Skip - Now -V
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Thus I present but a taste some of my addiction which you should totally not click on;

Uplifting Trance

Progressive House

Fairly New! Synthwave



The Midnight (Jazzy Synth Wave! HOLY EARGAZAM BATMAN!)


NEW!Chill Hip-Hop(?)

Ambient? I mean... whatever Tycho is... this.

Vocal Focus

(Soundtracks too!)

Halo / Ezio Assassins Creed / Mirrors Edge / Mass Effect / Skyrim ... so on.

  • Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?

Yep. Double Bass. I wanted to play Jazz and make my mother happy. (Awwwww <3) I no longer play, but I miss it. I could play, but I could have been much better. I didn't have my heart in the task. Someday perhaps I'll go guitar of some-sort or piano, time will tell. Wind instruments are GROSS. Spit valves ya'll. Ugh.

(Edit:Two of the songs I linked was not what I thought it was. Updated Vocals with extra links. Added end... prose?)

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music (Embed Vids)

by Harmanimus @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 22:30 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

Don't suppose you also listen to Perturbator, Carpenter Brut, or GUNSHIP? Or Chill Anime Beats?

I mean, I never got on the New Age Ethereal kick of Enya and Enigma and all that, but I do dig on Chill-Hop and Retrowave (and its periphery) pretty hard sometimes.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music (Embed Vids)

by INSANEdrive, ಥ_ಥ | f(ಠ‿↼)z | ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ| ¯\_(ツ)_/¯, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 22:39 (1586 days ago) @ Harmanimus

Don't suppose you also listen to Perturbator, Carpenter Brut, or GUNSHIP? Or Chill Anime Beats?

I mean, I never got on the New Age Ethereal kick of Enya and Enigma and all that, but I do dig on Chill-Hop and Retrowave (and its periphery) pretty hard sometimes.

Nor I, but I can understand the appeal of the New Age Music. Gunship sounds familiar, I may have seen it in my search. The rest I am unfamiliar with... at the moment.

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-ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ

-

... also Chill Hop is what it's called eh? Should of guessed.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music (Embed Vids)

by Harmanimus @, Sunday, April 08, 2018, 23:42 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

I guess it is for the best you didn't buy Pure Moods then, if that actually was the thing from your youth. I don't think anyone really should listen to Enya.

And Chill-Hop is what I've always heard it called in the circles I frequent. But genre definitions are just tools for communicating broad strokes. I listen to a lot of music with more Pop vocals but that seem to follow the chill beats (Purity Ring, Luna Shadows, Billie Eilish) side of thing that I personally call Popsicle, but I think that one is just me.

You might also dig Vaporwave, specifically, out of the current Retrowave, uh, wave.

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I concur. I think he would like vaporwave.

by Funkmon @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 00:17 (1586 days ago) @ Harmanimus

- No text -

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Noted.

by INSANEdrive, ಥ_ಥ | f(ಠ‿↼)z | ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ| ¯\_(ツ)_/¯, Monday, April 09, 2018, 00:49 (1586 days ago) @ Harmanimus

- No text -

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Oh my God. Is this a joke?

by Funkmon @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 00:14 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive
edited by Funkmon, Monday, April 09, 2018, 00:53

Some kid actually got brainwashed into liking that Pure Moods CD?! Oh my god that's hilarious, insanedrive. You have no idea how happy this makes me.

Man, I'm going to relate this story to everybody I know, how some kid almost spent a hundred dollars on that thing. Oh man. That's amazing. I'm so happy.

But anyway, to answer your question from the main post, the ideal music is really the Danubian tradition of Minnesang from the late twelfth century, though the pinnacle came slightly later with the Mädchenlied style in particular.

The problem with the more popular courtly love songs of this era, whether adapted from the Occitans or not, is either the unattainability of the woman, or the very courtly nature. They don't seem to resemble reality much. While the Tagelied and Pastorelle do have normal women, the situations just don't work. The Pastorelle involves a nobleman coming upon a shepardess on the marches or in the wild, and usually he takes advantage of her. The Tagelied, while much more reasonable than most courtly love in that it talks about the night of intimacy and parting in the morning, it's too dramatic.

The Mädchenlied is perfect. It gives the woman more of a part in the romance and addresses her directly. The songs address problems and solutions, and don't go for the absurd feminine ideals of normal courtly love. She doesn't have a high status. It's a love in the heart.

It's really just been down hill from about AD 1200, musically.

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All for you buckaroo.

by INSANEdrive, ಥ_ಥ | f(ಠ‿↼)z | ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ| ¯\_(ツ)_/¯, Monday, April 09, 2018, 00:45 (1586 days ago) @ Funkmon

Some kid actually got brainwashed into liking that Pure Moods CD?! Oh my god that's hilarious, insanedrive. You have no idea how happy this makes me.

Man, I'm going to relate this story to everybody I know, how some kid almost spent a hundred dollars on that thing. Oh man. That's amazing. I'm so happy.

Brainwash is abit strong of a word me thinks. I'd say I was more intrigued that music could sound so different then what I was generally used to at the time. I don't know if it was that CD in particular, all I remember was tubular bells was on it and it was a 2 disk set. Glad you got a kick out of the concept all the same.

But anyway, to answer your question from the main post, the ideal music is really the Danubian tradition of Minnesang from the late twelfth century, Mädchenlied style in particular.

The problem with the more popular courtly love songs of this era, whether adapted from the Occitans or not, is either the unattainability of the woman, or the very courtly nature. They don't seem to resemble reality much. While the Tagelied and Pastorelle do have normal women, the situations just don't work. The Pastorelle involves a nobleman coming upon a shepardess on the marches or in the wild, and usually he takes advantage of her. The Tagelied, while much more reasonable than most courtly love in that it talks about the night of intimacy and parting in the morning, it's too dramatic.

The Mädchenlied is perfect. It gives the woman more of a part in the romance and addresses her directly. The songs address problems and solutions, and don't go for the absurd feminine ideals of normal courtly love. She doesn't have a high status. It's a love in the heart.

It's really just been down hill from about AD 1200, musically.

You're a seriously eclectic bastard, you know that? I freaking love it, with the right dosage of course. :P

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by ZackDark @, Not behind you. NO! Don't look., Monday, April 09, 2018, 01:18 (1586 days ago) @ INSANEdrive
edited by ZackDark, Monday, April 09, 2018, 01:22

What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?

I, uh, don't. Right now, I pretty much only listen to music when driving or when trying to crunch some programming. Even then, with the former I just leave it at a radio station and forego any further choice of music and with the latter I often forget to do it when programming.

By the time Guardians of the Galaxy 1 released, I had a small bout of actually buying music and enjoying it, but it is gone now. I think the last thing I bought was GotG2's soundtrack, which has a much lower play count then the albums I first bought, even when normalizing by time.

Basically, music helps me tune out stray thoughts and focus on what I'm doing. Not that it is always successful, though...

How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?

My father is a very serious fan of progressive rock, so I grew up enjoying some British and Italian prog rock music from the 70s (maybe earlier, who knows?). Pink Floyd, Genesis and PFM will always have a sweet spot in my heart.

During my buying bout, I got into Arctic Monkeys (I was kind of surprised by how consistently I liked their music, across their career, despite noticeable change in style), Adele, uh, *checks library to cheat* Daft Punk and some other loose pieces.

EDIT: Still checking, I came across our very own CruelLEGACEY's music and boy, how the crap could I forget. Dude's pretty damn good. Kind of like deadmau5, but cooler. Check him out (@Music_Emoticon)

Right now, I'm pretty into synth/vaporwave when programming. No clue why, guess I just like music that sounds from the 80s and earlier.

Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?

Not really, just matchboxes (it's a thing down here, blame samba). Not anything of note (kind of like my soccer ability, I guess it's just something all Brazilians have at least a slight affinity to do). Due to my father's enormous (for his skill) collection of electric guitars, I've always considered playing them, but meh. I sometimes daydream about playing drums or bass, my two favorite lines in most music (give or take synths).

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How do you play a matchbox?

by Funkmon @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 06:47 (1585 days ago) @ ZackDark

- No text -

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First: Get 19 more of them.

by Vortech @, A Fourth Wheel, Monday, April 09, 2018, 07:53 (1585 days ago) @ Funkmon

- No text -

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Percussion, basically

by ZackDark @, Not behind you. NO! Don't look., Monday, April 09, 2018, 11:01 (1585 days ago) @ Funkmon

It is a 'homemade' caxixi which you can also tap like a drum.

Like so:

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Whoa

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 21:45 (1585 days ago) @ ZackDark

That's impressive. They don't actually SOUND the same, but as a concept, it kind of reminds me of playing spoons.

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Related Question:

by Vortech @, A Fourth Wheel, Monday, April 09, 2018, 07:51 (1585 days ago) @ ZackDark

Does deadmau5 qualify as a furry?

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Great, now I’m gonna be wondering that all day.

by CruelLEGACEY @, Toronto, Monday, April 09, 2018, 07:59 (1585 days ago) @ Vortech

- No text -

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music - Coding 2 Cruel

by dogcow @, Hiding from Bob, in the vent core., Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 07:31 (1584 days ago) @ ZackDark

EDIT: Still checking, I came across our very own CruelLEGACEY's music and boy, how the crap could I forget. Dude's pretty damn good. Kind of like deadmau5, but cooler. Check him out (@Music_Emoticon)

Right now, I'm pretty into synth/vaporwave when programming. No clue why, guess I just like music that sounds from the 80s and earlier.

I often code to Cruel's stuff. Most of his songs make for good coding music. The one exception is "Momentum." It does just kind of the opposite for me XD, it demands I stop & listen to it, I believe it's the R/L stereo effect going on in my headphones, so I leave it out of my coding playlist, but I do enjoy listening to it.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music - Coding 2 Cruel

by CruelLEGACEY @, Toronto, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 07:45 (1584 days ago) @ dogcow

EDIT: Still checking, I came across our very own CruelLEGACEY's music and boy, how the crap could I forget. Dude's pretty damn good. Kind of like deadmau5, but cooler. Check him out (@Music_Emoticon)

Right now, I'm pretty into synth/vaporwave when programming. No clue why, guess I just like music that sounds from the 80s and earlier.


I often code to Cruel's stuff. Most of his songs make for good coding music. The one exception is "Momentum." It does just kind of the opposite for me XD, it demands I stop & listen to it, I believe it's the R/L stereo effect going on in my headphones, so I leave it out of my coding playlist, but I do enjoy listening to it.

Funny story about that one. The echo you hear on the chord stabs that play throughout the song were an accident at first. I was messing around with a particular sound that had a simple echo on it, but I kept getting this rhythmic syncopated echo happening over top. It turned out I accidentally had secondary monitoring activated in my recording program, which was making me hear a extra echo due to latency. It just happened to be perfectly in time with the tempo of what I was playing. So I after recording it, I had to go back and add that extra echo because I liked the sound of it so much :)

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Thank you :)

by CruelLEGACEY @, Toronto, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 07:39 (1584 days ago) @ ZackDark

- No text -

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by CruelLEGACEY @, Toronto, Monday, April 09, 2018, 06:46 (1585 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

I love music. My parents had music playing in the house constantly while I was growing up, and I’m the same way now. I’m an 80s kid, so there was a lot of Peter Gabriel, Don Henley, the Police, Dire Straits, and Roxy Music in the house when I was a kid, all of which I have a soft spot for. But my parents were 60s kids themselves, so there was a lot of CSNY, Hendrix, Emmy Lou Harris, etc. The first concert I ever saw was Dwight Yoakam (he was awesome, lol).

Growing up in Toronto in the 80s, you pretty much had to love either Bryan Adams or Celine Dion, so I chose Adams. I still sing along like an idiot any time I hear Run to You.

I got into U2 in my early teens, right when I started learning how to play guitar. They were, and still are, a huge influence on me musically speaking. I went through a brief love afare with Radiohead, but I only like bits and pieces from them anymore. I love The Clash, Joy Division and New Order, Depeche Mode, The Cure, David Bowie, Coldplay, IAMX, Tears for Fears, Faunts, the 1975, Tycho. Anything with a synth-pop new-wave 80s vibe is a safe bet.

I can enjoy listening to most genres in small doses. I also played the flute for 8 years, so I’m fond of classical music (tchaikovsky FTW).

I started playing in a band and writing music in high school, and that had a big impact on how I listen to music. Learning to write music went hand-in-hand with learning how to record music (I’d always be recording demos to show the rest of the band what I’d come up with). This opened up a whole new dimension of appreciation for me. Now, any time I listen to music, I’ll enjoy the music itself while also studying how it has been mixed and arranged. There’s a real art & science to recording music... it’s a kind of sonic architecture (<-possibly the most pretentious sounding thing I’ve ever said, lol). That’s a big part of why Achtung Baby (by U2) is my favourite album of all time. Not only are the songs amazing, but from a production point of view it’s a masterpiece. Every single time I listen to it, I hear things I hadn’t heard before. There are songs where I can’t tell if I’m hearing 2 guitars or 12. The boundaries between all the instruments are blurred and swirled around until you can’t even picture something as real as a “band” playing them. It’s just sound. And yet it never sounds sloppy, or muddy, or complicated. It sounds simple and pure. It’s the Mona Lisa of music, as far as I’m concerned.

Side note: I never really got all the hype about the Mona Lisa until I saw it in person. I spent about half an hour in the same room as her... that thing is ALIVE. Every time I glanced back at it over my shoulder, it had changed. She’d moved a little, or her expression had shifted. The more time went by, the more every other painting in the room felt like pieces of wallpaper, while she felt more and more like a person standing in the room.

Anyway, I played in bands for years, but stopped doing that about 6 years ago. I do a lot of writing and recording music at home though. I’ll go weeks at a time without listening to anything other than what I’m working on, then I’ll come up for air and listen to a bunch of stuff; half for enjoyment, and half to try and figure out how they achieved certain sounds or solved a specific problem. What still surprises me to this day is that the side of my brain that is obsessing over the technical aspects of how music is recorded hasn’t interferes with my pure emotional enjoyment of listening to music. It just got bolted on as an additive.

As far as the bonus question goes, I already mentioned guitar and flute. I play a tiny bit of piano, which I’m finally able to dedicate some time to now that I actually own a piano for the first time. I can bang out a few chords on a mandolin, and if you put an upright Bass in my hands I can play “Love Cats” :)

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Harmanimus @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 10:03 (1585 days ago) @ CruelLEGACEY

The Clash, Joy Division and New Order, Depeche Mode, The Cure, David Bowie, Coldplay, IAMX, Tears for Fears, Faunts, the 1975, Tycho.

Have you ever listened to Covenant or Sisters of Mercy?

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by CruelLEGACEY @, Toronto, Monday, April 09, 2018, 12:57 (1585 days ago) @ Harmanimus

The Clash, Joy Division and New Order, Depeche Mode, The Cure, David Bowie, Coldplay, IAMX, Tears for Fears, Faunts, the 1975, Tycho.

Have you ever listened to Covenant or Sisters of Mercy?

Only a tiny bit. I liked what I heard :)

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Monday, April 09, 2018, 10:49 (1585 days ago) @ INSANEdrive
edited by Kermit, Monday, April 09, 2018, 10:54

I have recently found myself with time to just... think. It's been nice. One of the things I've been pondering about is music, why I like what I like and what not. I've lived long enough now that through my memories I can watch the journey I've had thus far of my musical taste. From the seeds planted by my parents own musical tastes, to now where a set of sounds can transport me in time as effectively as smell can. Not only transport but change a room, like some sort of shared psychosis. After all, it's not the room that has changed, but the people in it.

I know. This post is off the cuff here I... I wasn't planning this or anything, it's just I yet again find myself with simple curiosity and an outlet to ask of it. I mean, at worst, Funkmon will present us with an essay why the Polka is ultimate form of music or something. :P

So I'm just going to throw down some questions here, and see where this leads.
------------------------------------------------------

  • What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?

Music with a hook (vocal or instrumental), so I’m not an anti-pop snob, but stupid lyrics tend to turn me off, and I do appreciate a zag where I was expecting a zig. Depends on the genre, too. I generally dislike most popular country, but I love traditional country and Americana.

Music is the language of emotion, and outside of the pharmaceuticals no other stimuli affects mood more. I don’t mean to characterize it as only that. Great music is art and does what art does: it expresses something fundamental in us. Also, more so than when I was younger, music has becomes a means of time travel.

[*]How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?

Grew up in a household were music was greatly valued. Several people on my mom’s side of the family were professional musicians for some or part of their lives. Worked in a record store through all of the 1980s, and as a result I have about 1,000 LPs (this doesn’t count digital or CDs). During that time I liked at least some things in every genre of music (and could convince newcomers to any genre that I was an enthusiast). I liked all pop as a kid in the 70s (bad and good), but the Beatles were my touchstone, and following the roots of their music back got me into 50s rock n roll, girl groups, Motown, country (Hank, Sr!), tin pan alley, what have you. Following their innovations forward got me into more experimental stuff like Roxy Music and Bowie. I deejayed for several years in college (mainly new wave, punk, college rock [lots of stuff Cruel likes]), I saw hundreds of shows between 1980 and 2000, including many big names before they were that big (To name a few: saw U2 at their first U.S. show of their War tour [amazing], Ryan Adams played at my house during a party once—I’ve met quite a few people, too.) In my 20s and 30s I went to club shows frequently. Around 2000 I slowed down some, but instead of going to PAX as a fan pilgrimage, I went to SXSW, and at the time was familiar with most acts I saw there. Some of you already know I’m a big Springsteen fan. I’ve seen him close to 30 times.

I listen to much more classical than I used to, but I don’t know if my tastes have changed (and for better or for worse, gaming has supplanted music as my primary hobby). I simply find less new music that interests me now. (This depresses me a little. I never wanted to be one of those old people who was clueless about what the kids liked.) Even when I hear something I like, it tends to remind me of somebody else that already did something very similar 25 years ago. There’s a sameness to Top 40--I can’t tell a lot of it apart. Whereas I used to buy one or two albums per week, now I’m back to how I listened to music as a kid. For one thing, my young-adult concern for street cred is dead, Zed (think of the John Cusack/Jack Black characters in High Infidelity). I listen to streaming services, and whereas I used to buy 45s every week, now I buy a song or two and become obsessed with two or three albums per year (Last two albums bought: Dan Aeurbach—Waiting for a Song, Phil Spector—Back to Mono box set [That's been on my wish list for 30 years]. Two favorites from the last five years: Daft Punk—Random Access Memories, Jason Isbell--Southeastern). Last live show: The Blasters? Last live show I’m sorry I missed: Dengue Fever. Next live show I’ll see: Paul Simon (his last tour supposedly). They’ll probably need to schedule some bathroom breaks for that one.

[*]Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?
[/list]

No, I’ve dabbled on clarinet (in school) and piano and guitar (at home). The highlight of my musical career was playing “Moonlight Sonata” from memory for my uncle (he played in an orchestra and was the true musician of the family). I did it perfectly only once, for him. I have my mom’s piano now. I’d like to take lessons, but I think it will be challenging due to a hand injury. :(

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 21:51 (1585 days ago) @ Kermit

Ryan Adams played at my house during a party once

Really? I have a friend who would probably want your autograph. :)

Dan Aeurbach—Waiting for a Song

The guy from The Black Keys, right? See, you're still with the times. No need to worry yet. I KNOW he did an NPR Tiny Desk concert very recently and I was going to grab it just now and post it for you, but it looks like they don't have it posted yet. It always takes them forever. :(

Jason Isbell

OK the number of people with decent taste who've mentioned him is now too high to ignore. Perhaps I'll finally get around to looking him up.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 14:05 (1584 days ago) @ stabbim

Dan Aeurbach—Waiting for a Song


The guy from The Black Keys, right? See, you're still with the times. No need to worry yet. I KNOW he did an NPR Tiny Desk concert very recently and I was going to grab it just now and post it for you, but it looks like they don't have it posted yet. It always takes them forever. :(

Ah, here it is. I was only looking at their YouTube channel at first, because the last time I tried to use their own web player, it would ONLY work in IE. But it's currently working fine for me in Firefox.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 14:17 (1584 days ago) @ stabbim

Dan Aeurbach—Waiting for a Song


The guy from The Black Keys, right? See, you're still with the times. No need to worry yet. I KNOW he did an NPR Tiny Desk concert very recently and I was going to grab it just now and post it for you, but it looks like they don't have it posted yet. It always takes them forever. :(


Ah, here it is. I was only looking at their YouTube channel at first, because the last time I tried to use their own web player, it would ONLY work in IE. But it's currently working fine for me in Firefox.

Thanks!

BTW, Ryan Adams was probably 17 or 18 at the time. He was known in the local scene as the kid who crashed on your couch, drank a lot, played in numerous bands, and purportedly wrote a song a day.

Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Claude Errera @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 11:45 (1585 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?

Music used to define the timing of my life; I could tell you when an album came out by what I was doing when it was released. Sometimes to the day. (That's changed; I still listen to a lot of music, and it's an important mood stabilizer... but I no longer keep track of life events that way.)

I look for music that says something to me. It can be something as simple as "hey, tap your foot to me!" or as complicated as "this is a concept that you should think about every time you make a major decision." In recent years, that comes down to predominately 'singer-songwriters' - a category that is often folk or indie. (Or indie folk.)

How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?

This is a pretty tough question to answer - partly because the world has changed, and the way I consume music changed with it... and it's hard to untie the method of consumption with the product itself. When I was a kid, the primary way of finding new music was the radio - I listened to a lot of popular music in high school, because that was the easiest thing to hear. I got to college, and discovering new bands became an obsession; I fell in love with the alternative/indie sound that you could find in small clubs. The message became more important (for a while) than the sound - clever lyrics trumped polished instrumentation. (I mean, eventually, I found bands that had both... but when you're listening to 3 new bands a night, you hear a lot of shit, and you quickly find something that hooks you and keeps you coming back, or you stop going to clubs. For me, the hook was a good lyric.)

All that said... there's no 'one band' (or 'ten bands') that define my musical taste; I listen to (and have always listened to) lots and lots of different things. There aren't too many things off-limits... I'm not a huge fan of metal, or hip-hop, or (true) country, but almost anything else goes. (And even in those genres, there are exceptions.)

When I was in the 'write your favorite band on your notebook' phase, I was a big fan of the Eagles... but I'm not sure if that's because I loved their music, or if I just loved their logo. (I definitely like their music; I just don't know if that's what drove me to brand my notebooks with their name.)

[image]

Also listened to a lot of the Moody Blues, but without the hallucinogenics.

In college, I listened to a lot of REM, Talking Heads, The Housemartins, Thomas Dolby, Howard Jones, Tears for Fears, The Specials, Fine Young Cannibals, English Beat, The Jam... and tons and tons of bands that nobody outside of Somerville MA had ever heard of (and then only if you were alive and listening to music in the early 80s). Also, mostly due to a roommate, I listened to (and liked) a bunch of early rap - Grand Master Flash, Run DMC, Beasty Boys. Lost interest when the subject matter changed to money, drugs, and sex.

When I joined the Peace Corps, I started listening to more political/socially aware artists - Bruce Cockburn, Michelle Shocked, Indigo Girls, Beautiful South (though I'm told that in the UK, they're not really considered political, they're considered 'Poppy' - I listened to them because Beautiful South is what Paul Heaton did when the Housemartins broke up; I fell in love with the weirdness of "Woman in the Wall", and I really liked their cynical look at the world). I stuck with all of them after I got back to the US.

Hothouse Flowers' 'People' was my favorite album of 1988, in a way that no album has ever been before or since. (I don't really even listen to it any more, but MAN was I obsessed then!)

The 90s and 00s saw infatuations with Garland Jeffries, The Frames, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jack Johnson, John Gorka, Jonathan Coulton, the Proclaimers, Suzanne Vega, Uncle Bonsai (and the Electric Bonsai Band), many more.

Through it all, some bands have always been there, their music interwoven with the threads of my life: The Beatles, Barenaked Ladies, Billy Joel, BoDeans, David Bowie, Dire Straits (and Mark Knopfler solo after they broke up), Elvis Costello, Neil Young, Pink Floyd, the Police, the Pretenders, Queen, Randy Newman, Rickie Lee Jones, Simon and Garfunkel, Steely Dan, Supertramp, the Who, Warren Zevon.

I love bands whose lyrics and music tell totally different stories: for example, Nelly McKay writes biting, sarcastic, often dark lyrics to super-bouncy (or elegantly-smooth) music. Sometimes I find bands who irritate the hell out of me, until they don't - I first heard Jonatha Brooke on a compilation album, and HATED her voice. But I loved the album, and so I heard that song a lot... and eventually I went and found other stuff she'd done. I love her band The Story. I love her solo stuff. She still has a super-distinctive singing style, and when I hear other people do that voice-cracking thing, it's like fingernails on a chalkboard... but I still love it when she does it.

I like novelty stuff. I listened to Doctor Demento when I was growing up, and I've enjoyed Weird Al since... geez, probably 1980. I already mentioned Jonathan Coulton. Paul and Storm make me laugh. Mojo Nixon has a place in my collection. (A few places, even.)

David Wilcox is a folk singer-songwriter that I first heard in early 1991... I discovered that his songs are chock-full of ideas that sort of guide the way I live. (I'm not saying I live that way because he told me to; I'm saying I have some underlying guiding principles, and his music does an amazing job of outlining them, which means he has the same underlying guiding principles.)

Most recent discovery was Nico Vega (I heard a song of theirs in a Verizon ad, loved it, looked up who did it, discovered that I like MOST of their stuff).

That probably covers 10% of the music that's shaped me. ;) (Okay, more than 10%... but there are literally hundreds of unmentioned artists that should be on a list of music that has affected my life.)

Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?

Played a clarinet for a year in grade school, until I had a pretty bad accident and knocked out all of my front teeth; a reed instrument suddenly became quite difficult, and I quit. Tried learning guitar in the Peace Corps, mostly failed. (I mean, I learned a few chords, but it wasn't even good enough to keep people around a campfire entertained.)

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Monday, April 09, 2018, 12:21 (1585 days ago) @ Claude Errera

What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?


Music used to define the timing of my life; I could tell you when an album came out by what I was doing when it was released. Sometimes to the day. (That's changed; I still listen to a lot of music, and it's an important mood stabilizer... but I no longer keep track of life events that way.)

I look for music that says something to me. It can be something as simple as "hey, tap your foot to me!" or as complicated as "this is a concept that you should think about every time you make a major decision." In recent years, that comes down to predominately 'singer-songwriters' - a category that is often folk or indie. (Or indie folk.)

How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?


This is a pretty tough question to answer - partly because the world has changed, and the way I consume music changed with it... and it's hard to untie the method of consumption with the product itself. When I was a kid, the primary way of finding new music was the radio - I listened to a lot of popular music in high school, because that was the easiest thing to hear. I got to college, and discovering new bands became an obsession; I fell in love with the alternative/indie sound that you could find in small clubs. The message became more important (for a while) than the sound - clever lyrics trumped polished instrumentation. (I mean, eventually, I found bands that had both... but when you're listening to 3 new bands a night, you hear a lot of shit, and you quickly find something that hooks you and keeps you coming back, or you stop going to clubs. For me, the hook was a good lyric.)

All that said... there's no 'one band' (or 'ten bands') that define my musical taste; I listen to (and have always listened to) lots and lots of different things. There aren't too many things off-limits... I'm not a huge fan of metal, or hip-hop, or (true) country, but almost anything else goes. (And even in those genres, there are exceptions.)

When I was in the 'write your favorite band on your notebook' phase, I was a big fan of the Eagles... but I'm not sure if that's because I loved their music, or if I just loved their logo. (I definitely like their music; I just don't know if that's what drove me to brand my notebooks with their name.)

[image]

Also listened to a lot of the Moody Blues, but without the hallucinogenics.

In college, I listened to a lot of REM, Talking Heads, The Housemartins, Thomas Dolby, Howard Jones, Tears for Fears, The Specials, Fine Young Cannibals, English Beat, The Jam... and tons and tons of bands that nobody outside of Somerville MA had ever heard of (and then only if you were alive and listening to music in the early 80s). Also, mostly due to a roommate, I listened to (and liked) a bunch of early rap - Grand Master Flash, Run DMC, Beasty Boys. Lost interest when the subject matter changed to money, drugs, and sex.

When I joined the Peace Corps, I started listening to more political/socially aware artists - Bruce Cockburn, Michelle Shocked, Indigo Girls, Beautiful South (though I'm told that in the UK, they're not really considered political, they're considered 'Poppy' - I listened to them because Beautiful South is what Paul Heaton did when the Housemartins broke up; I fell in love with the weirdness of "Woman in the Wall", and I really liked their cynical look at the world). I stuck with all of them after I got back to the US.

Hothouse Flowers' 'People' was my favorite album of 1988, in a way that no album has ever been before or since. (I don't really even listen to it any more, but MAN was I obsessed then!)

The 90s and 00s saw infatuations with Garland Jeffries, The Frames, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jack Johnson, John Gorka, Jonathan Coulton, the Proclaimers, Suzanne Vega, Uncle Bonsai (and the Electric Bonsai Band), many more.

Through it all, some bands have always been there, their music interwoven with the threads of my life: The Beatles, Barenaked Ladies, Billy Joel, BoDeans, David Bowie, Dire Straits (and Mark Knopfler solo after they broke up), Elvis Costello, Neil Young, Pink Floyd, the Police, the Pretenders, Queen, Randy Newman, Rickie Lee Jones, Simon and Garfunkel, Steely Dan, Supertramp, the Who, Warren Zevon.

I love bands whose lyrics and music tell totally different stories: for example, Nelly McKay writes biting, sarcastic, often dark lyrics to super-bouncy (or elegantly-smooth) music. Sometimes I find bands who irritate the hell out of me, until they don't - I first heard Jonatha Brooke on a compilation album, and HATED her voice. But I loved the album, and so I heard that song a lot... and eventually I went and found other stuff she'd done. I love her band The Story. I love her solo stuff. She still has a super-distinctive singing style, and when I hear other people do that voice-cracking thing, it's like fingernails on a chalkboard... but I still love it when she does it.

I like novelty stuff. I listened to Doctor Demento when I was growing up, and I've enjoyed Weird Al since... geez, probably 1980. I already mentioned Jonathan Coulton. Paul and Storm make me laugh. Mojo Nixon has a place in my collection. (A few places, even.)

David Wilcox is a folk singer-songwriter that I first heard in early 1991... I discovered that his songs are chock-full of ideas that sort of guide the way I live. (I'm not saying I live that way because he told me to; I'm saying I have some underlying guiding principles, and his music does an amazing job of outlining them, which means he has the same underlying guiding principles.)

Most recent discovery was Nico Vega (I heard a song of theirs in a Verizon ad, loved it, looked up who did it, discovered that I like MOST of their stuff).

That probably covers 10% of the music that's shaped me. ;) (Okay, more than 10%... but there are literally hundreds of unmentioned artists that should be on a list of music that has affected my life.)

Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?


Played a clarinet for a year in grade school, until I had a pretty bad accident and knocked out all of my front teeth; a reed instrument suddenly became quite difficult, and I quit. Tried learning guitar in the Peace Corps, mostly failed. (I mean, I learned a few chords, but it wasn't even good enough to keep people around a campfire entertained.)

We've had very similar journeys. I like a lot of what you like. That U2 show I mentioned--Grand Master Flash opened up for them, and they were great. Seems like that kind of thing was more common then. Maybe I'm wrong. Didn't lose my front teeth, but attending a high school where marching band was the THING put at end to clarinet playing. I don't march, and I got tired of sitting in an empty practice room during football season.

Heh - inappropriate pairings...

by Claude Errera @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 14:17 (1585 days ago) @ Kermit

That U2 show I mentioned--Grand Master Flash opened up for them, and they were great. Seems like that kind of thing was more common then. Maybe I'm wrong.

Late 80s, somewhere in the northeast (can't remember where - some big arena... maybe Worchester?). Stevie Ray Vaughan was opening for the Moody Blues.

I actually went to see Stevie Ray, but for me, the Moody Blues were a nice bonus.

The man was booed off the stage by a bunch of 40-something baby boomers who really, really, REALLY wanted to see the Moody Blues.

I almost left in disgust.

(I guess I was more angry at whoever thought that was a reasonable pairing than I was at the idiots, though.)

I remember seeing the Cars open for Kansas. New Wave youngsters mingled (badly) with older soft rockers; nobody respected anybody. Again, I enjoyed both acts, but not the audience.

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Heh - inappropriate pairings...

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Monday, April 09, 2018, 16:00 (1585 days ago) @ Claude Errera

That U2 show I mentioned--Grand Master Flash opened up for them, and they were great. Seems like that kind of thing was more common then. Maybe I'm wrong.


Late 80s, somewhere in the northeast (can't remember where - some big arena... maybe Worchester?). Stevie Ray Vaughan was opening for the Moody Blues.

I actually went to see Stevie Ray, but for me, the Moody Blues were a nice bonus.

The man was booed off the stage by a bunch of 40-something baby boomers who really, really, REALLY wanted to see the Moody Blues.

I almost left in disgust.

(I guess I was more angry at whoever thought that was a reasonable pairing than I was at the idiots, though.)

Oh my gosh, that's about as bad as Hendrix opening up for the Monkees in 1967. (One my best friends saw this show, was completely ignorant about Hendrix, but to his credit was blown away.)

A big regret is that I never got to see Stevie Ray. We did have an in-store with him so I got to hang with him a bit and get his autograph--he was a very nice guy. Saw his brother's group, the Fabulous Thunderbirds, a few times.

I remember seeing the Cars open for Kansas. New Wave youngsters mingled (badly) with older soft rockers; nobody respected anybody. Again, I enjoyed both acts, but not the audience.

I really liked the Cars until I saw them. They had fully embraced synths by that time, and didn't even seem to be playing. From where I was sitting I could see a guy in back behind the risers pushing a button to start each song. After that I always joked that the "Drive" video, which featured a lot mannequins, was actually live concert footage.

I used to get free tickets now and then and would often go to shows only to see the opening act. I'll tell this story for Cruel's benefit: I was a fan of the first few Bryan Adams records (before he got big and became the soundtrack king). He fashioned himself as kind of Canadian Bruce Springsteen. I saw him open for Loverboy and he was great. I despised Loverboy but my cute date liked them so stayed. It was horrible. Mike Reno in red leather is nightmare stuff. Not worth it.

One more pair just popped into my mind. The Go Gos had just hit, and opened for the Police on the Ghost in the Machine tour. I was actually a big fan of both, but it was funny seeing all these pubescent girls wearing black trash bags as tops file out between sets. The Police were an amazing band live. Remind me to tell you my Andy Summers story sometime...

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Heh - inappropriate pairings...

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 16:10 (1585 days ago) @ Kermit

I see a lot of people dismiss Bryan Adams these days, but I've always kind of liked his stuff.

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Heh - inappropriate pairings...

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Monday, April 09, 2018, 16:15 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

I see a lot of people dismiss Bryan Adams these days, but I've always kind of liked his stuff.

Oh, he had good stuff. He got a little repetitive after success but I don't begrudge his success.

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One more memory

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Monday, April 09, 2018, 16:13 (1585 days ago) @ Kermit

You mentioned Kansas. I liked Kansas as a kid. I thought "Dust in the Wind" was DEEP and learned to play it on the guitar. Here's where our tastes might split. What I loved to hate when I got older was just about anything labeled progressive rock. Not quite as dogmatic about it now, but give me the Clash any day.

This reminds me of my first Springsteen concert in 1981. Still one of the best shows I've ever seen--incredible. I went with a very sweet girl (still a friend and still sweet). We were very young and she'd only seen one other concert--Kansas. After seeing Springsteen she said, "That was almost as good as Kansas." That line became a running joke with my buddies whenever we saw a great show. :)

One more memory

by Claude Errera @, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 08:43 (1584 days ago) @ Kermit

You mentioned Kansas. I liked Kansas as a kid. I thought "Dust in the Wind" was DEEP and learned to play it on the guitar. Here's where our tastes might split. What I loved to hate when I got older was just about anything labeled progressive rock. Not quite as dogmatic about it now, but give me the Clash any day.

Huh... i always slotted Kansas into the same box as, say, Styx, and REO Speedwagon... formulaic bands with plenty of technical skill, but music that was popular because it was BUILT to be popular. Almost industrially-so. You can predict where the bridge is gonna be placed, because it's where it's placed in ALL of their hits. Etc.

I don't think I ever thought of Kansas as Prog Rock... that was the realm of Yes, and Gentle Giant, and Rush, and (early) Genesis. And so on.

This reminds me of my first Springsteen concert in 1981. Still one of the best shows I've ever seen--incredible. I went with a very sweet girl (still a friend and still sweet). We were very young and she'd only seen one other concert--Kansas. After seeing Springsteen she said, "That was almost as good as Kansas." That line became a running joke with my buddies whenever we saw a great show. :)

Heh. I don't think anything I've ever seen live has compared to the energy of a Springsteen concert. The man's amazing on stage.

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One more memory

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 09:47 (1584 days ago) @ Claude Errera


Heh. I don't think anything I've ever seen live has compared to the energy of a Springsteen concert. The man's amazing on stage.

Yeah, I think he's someone you have to see to "get." Such a generous performer.

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Heh - inappropriate pairings...

by Cody Miller @, Music of the Spheres - Never Forgot, Monday, April 09, 2018, 16:35 (1585 days ago) @ Claude Errera

I actually went to see Stevie Ray, but for me, the Moody Blues were a nice bonus.

The man was booed off the stage by a bunch of 40-something baby boomers who really, really, REALLY wanted to see the Moody Blues.

My father told me about a time when he saw The Rolling Stones. The opening act starts to play, and everybody goes nuts because they hate him so much booing, and trowing tons of stuff at him on stage. Jagger had to come out and tell them to calm down and give the dude a chance, as he really liked him.

The opening act? Prince.

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Heh - inappropriate pairings...

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Monday, April 09, 2018, 16:45 (1585 days ago) @ Cody Miller

I actually went to see Stevie Ray, but for me, the Moody Blues were a nice bonus.

The man was booed off the stage by a bunch of 40-something baby boomers who really, really, REALLY wanted to see the Moody Blues.


My father told me about a time when he saw The Rolling Stones. The opening act starts to play, and everybody goes nuts because they hate him so much booing, and trowing tons of stuff at him on stage. Jagger had to come out and tell them to calm down and give the dude a chance, as he really liked him.

The opening act? Prince.

I knew what the symbol meant, dude. I'd share my Prince story but many of my concert stories are actually just bad date stories so I think I'll stop.

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Heh - inappropriate pairings...

by Cody Miller @, Music of the Spheres - Never Forgot, Monday, April 09, 2018, 17:33 (1585 days ago) @ Kermit

I actually went to see Stevie Ray, but for me, the Moody Blues were a nice bonus.

The man was booed off the stage by a bunch of 40-something baby boomers who really, really, REALLY wanted to see the Moody Blues.


My father told me about a time when he saw The Rolling Stones. The opening act starts to play, and everybody goes nuts because they hate him so much booing, and trowing tons of stuff at him on stage. Jagger had to come out and tell them to calm down and give the dude a chance, as he really liked him.

The opening act? Prince.


I knew what the symbol meant, dude.

I changed it because he dropped the symbol and was known as 'Prince' when he died. That wasn't his name then, nor now.

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Heh - inappropriate pairings...

by bluerunner @, Music City, Monday, April 09, 2018, 18:32 (1585 days ago) @ Claude Errera

I saw Skynyrd (well, what was left of them) and ZZ Top when I was in college. I was friends with the daughter of Skynyrd's bassist at the time. They played first and over half the crowd left after they finished. ZZ Top put on a far better show, and I was shocked that so many people missed it.

Weirdest combination also involved ZZ Top. It was part of the 50th anniversary events for the Corvette, and my girlfriend's dad worked in the Corvette plant in Bowling Green. They threw a concert for GM employees and family. The Four Tops (60's Motown) opened for ZZ Top.

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You win.

by Funkmon @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 23:12 (1585 days ago) @ bluerunner

The Four Tops opening for ZZ Top. Man. That must have been a weird show.

Some of the mismatches we get here in Detroit involve Motown and other local musicians. Like, randomly Kid Rock, Ted Nugent, guys like that, will show up at any concert and do a song or two.

Here's a strange one that went in reverse though. I was seeing Kid Rock, and Ricky Medlocke from Skynyrd showed up for a song. What the hell was that about?

The best one I have ever seen was Ted showing up at a jazz and blues club in Detroit (Baker's, if anyone's into jazz. Nico might know it). For those not in the know, Ted Nugent is not just a guy who screams constantly, plays guitar too fast, and rants about liberals. He is a god-tier blues guitarist, and grew up idolizing the jazz guitarists: it's why he plays with a Byrdland. Anyway, Ted just gets asked to jam and they do some bomb ass soloing over 4 bar blues. Good times.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by ManKitten, The Stugotz is strong in me., Monday, April 09, 2018, 13:52 (1585 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

  • What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?

Music used to be a big part of my life but not so much these days. I don't know if it's because I'm older, or the way we consume music has changed. Growing up as a kid the music in my life was whatever my parents listened to. So lots of Golden Oldies from my Mom and Rock from my Dad. I remember when my dad showed me his record collection for the first time. I guess he figured I was old enough to respect vinyl without destroying it. Beatles, Elvis, Pink Floyd, James Gang, The Who, you name it. But I was drawn to one album for some reason. Led Zeppelin II. He showed me how to work the turn table. After a heavy pop and a couple of scratches, the opening riffs for Whole Lotta Love started playing. It was awesome! Until then, the music I was exposed to were generally Christian groups like DC Talk and Newsboys. When I got into middle school I subscribed to BMG music service and could get 15 cd's for 1 cent! Some of the first cd's I ordered consisted of Green Day, 311, White Zombie, Pantera, Nirvana, Soundgarden. The first cd I put was Pantera: Great Southern Trendkill. I still remember the feeling of anxiety creep over as I heard Phil Anselmo screaming into the mic as ravenous drums and guitar shredded my speakers. It was a feeling of fear and excitement. This is when I said to myself "I want to learn to play guitar."

[*]How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?

I think the only way my taste has changed is just with my ability to stay up-to-date. Last week I had to ask my wife "Who the heck is Cardy B and what does he sing?" While I like anything with a guitar (except neo glam country) I've always been a metalhead. Groups like Pantera, Necrophagist, Between the Buried and Me, Job for a Cowboy, and whatever ridiculous grunting pig squeal that might make my ears bleed. Lately, I've been trying to keep it a lot lighter. Having a kid and recent social/political events...metal isn't the best go to. I'm diving back into classic r&b and pop. Sometimes some Sia and 21 Pilots and Daft Punk.

[*]Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?
[/list]

As a kid I was forced to take piano lessons and I was actually really good. I hated it, but I was good. My parents always said "you'll thank us when you're older." Well, they were right...I wish I had kept playing because now I don't remember how and I wish I still could. Eventually got a guitar, then a bass guitar, learned to play both pretty well but not great. Was good friends with my neighbor who was an amazing musician and did a couple of projects with him. Played in a cover band for a while rotating between guitar, bass and drums. Was probably best at drums. I rarely play anymore, my guitars all hang on my wall. My 4 year old son has a childs drum kit and he likes to play it and is actually pretty good. I'll probably plug my old Ibanez into my amp soon enough and play along with his crazy beats.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 16:08 (1585 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

[*]What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?

Well, as I alluded to here, part of it is that I don't like to think what I'm listening to is artificial or insincere in any way. It's a little hard to define, but I generally prefer music that was actually created by the person or group whose name is on it, you know? Doesn't have to be exclusive, plenty of people I listen to use co-writers and the like. I'm just not a big fan of the scenario where someone gets famous recording vocals on tracks that are really someone else's creative work. Beyond that, I dunno if there is anything very specific that I look for. I don't think I've ever had a genre. I probably tend to gravitate most towards the sort of emo/pop-punk/post-hardcore scene that was big in the mid-2000's, but that's hardly exclusive. I guess I just want good grooves, and music that's actually ABOUT something. Feelings, politics, whatever. Just not about partying in the club, you know?

[*]How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?

This is the most interesting question here, for me. I didn't really have ANY taste for music through most of my childhood. I can remember, in elementary or middle school, other kids wearing shirts to school that said "311" or "Tool." I had basically no awareness of what any of it meant. Music wasn't a big thing in my house, and TBH I didn't have very many friends - and none of them were really into music either.

Somewhere towards the very end of high school, I did finally become aware of SOME music. It was mostly the sort of rock music that would get played on the radio. Metallica and the like. I went to an Incubus concert in high school (Hoobastank opened for them - oh yeah), and like everyone at the time (I graduated in '03, for reference) I was into Linkin Park's first two albums. And of course everyone was listening to Limp Bizkit back then although I could not explain why to you now. Oh, and I guess I did listen to some Eminem. The Eminem Show came out during my junior year, and that was all that was coming out of anyone's cars for a good 6 months. Or more. Around this same time, my best friend (who has almost no interest or definable taste in music otherwise) got me into Meat Loaf. Yeah, I know - but the Bat Out of Hell albums do still kind of work for me, for some reason.

Note: This is the singer I referred to here.

Back then, I hadn't developed my snobbish opinions on music yet. Later, I reconciled those opinions with my Meat Loaf fandom by telling myself that because the Bat Out of Hell albums were rock operas performed as a sort of show, that Meat Loaf was actually just an actor playing a character. And TBH, I think it's true. Fun fact: I own physical copies of NEARLY every Meat Loaf album ever made. There was one compilation album I didn't buy because it was made up entirely of tracks from things I already owned. But otherwise, I have them all - at least, as of around 2004 when I set out to do it.

High school is also when one of my worst characteristics (IMO) started. Which is that I do a TERRIBLE job of discovering new music. Both new artists, and even additional stuff from artists I know. The reason (at least initially) was that the radio antenna in my car was broken. Note that I said the antenna, not the radio. It was known that the radio didn't work in the car I bought from my Dad my junior year - it couldn't receive anything at all. However, after I replaced the head unit in that car, the radio still didn't work (yes, I plugged the antenna cable in). Somewhere in that car between the head unit and the antenna, there was a break. The result of that was that the only music I had through all of high school and college was what I could load on to CDs (I did at least have MP3 CDs as a resource). The result of THAT was that I would tend to just let what I already had stay on repeat for a LONG time, and I absolutely never listened to the radio. This, combined with a very small number of actual close friends (one of whom, as mentioned, is not that into music), meant that I never had any idea what was current, new, or popular. Even during college when MySpace was a thing, I only had like 1 or 2 people I actually talked to frequently on there. I must have been the only person my age at that time who didn't discover music through MySpace.

During college, and the next 2-3 years after that, I started getting into the stuff I mentioned above. Emo, pop-punk, post-hardcore type stuff. While my own capacity to discover music was almost non-existent, I did make friends with a couple of guys who got me into things like Taking Back Sunday, Say Anything, and MCR. One of them also got me into Ben Folds - he played guitar and I heard him do a few Ben Folds Five songs. He also loaned me a few compilation albums. Warped Tour compilations, and a Drive-Thru Records/Fueled by Ramen sampler where I first heard my favorite band, Paramore. Side note: Paramore has probably been my favorite band since around 2007 when I got their second album, but I didn't actually realize that until more recently, like around 2014. It just finally hit me one day that I had never heard a song of theirs that I didn't love. For the most part, I kind of stuck to that same type of music, other than a brief fling with country music around 2005 or 2006. 4 or 5 years ago, I had a sudden epiphany that maybe pop music wasn't all terrible, but that realization really started around 2007:

I was working in an office at the time, and they had satellite radio rotating between a bunch of stations that the staff had chosen. Most of it didn't really interest me - I probably should have been excited to finally know what was playing on popular radio, but I was pretty thoroughly into my "I don't listen to popular music" stubbornness by then. But I do remember hearing my first Taylor Swift song (it was "Should've Said No," if you're wondering). Something about it struck me as different from the other stuff on that country station, though I didn't really know why. For the next several years, I always paid attention to her as she very quickly exploded, but I wouldn't have admitted it to anyone at the time. I actually remember a special about her coming on a TV news show when I was at my parents' place for Thanksgiving, and I very discretely made sure the TV stayed on that channel without really telling anyone why. A bit later, I think after her second album was out, a good friend of mine who is a MUCH more severe music snob than I have ever been, told he was learning one of Taylor's songs to play to his girlfriend (now wife), and he just happened to mention in passing "she writes her own songs, you know." This, in my mind, essentially gave me permission to become a shameless Stan. ANYWAY, the point of all this is that I remained one, and when 1989 came out I finally was convinced to listen to something outside of my guitar/bass/drums comfort zone, and admit that something that includes electronics could actually be creatively valid.

This has opened a floodgate that I'm still not sure how to cope with - there's so much out there now, and combined with my music habits (as a holdover from when I had a limited selection, I still tend to listen to the same album for weeks at a time), I constantly feel like I'm falling behind. My list of to-buy albums on Amazon is pages long. Oh, I just realized I forgot to mention the other problem with me and music - I have never gotten on board with the streaming music movement. I have never subscribed to a paid service, and I HATE ads with a burning passion. So everything I listen to is stuff I actually possess (I would like to say "own," but I admit that I went through a BitTorrent phase many years ago in an attempt to catch up with all the great stuff I had missed - I'm not proud of it), barring an occasional YouTube session (I just finished listening to "The Shape of Punk to Come," - thanks, kidtsunami!).

[*]Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?
[/list]

Nope. I've never had any creative impulse at all, as far as I can remember.


I would love to go into more of what I ACTUALLY listen to, as it's not really represented here for the most part. I tried to just focus on points in my life where there were identifiable changes. But this post is already a wall of text. :)

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Fighting Words.

by Harmanimus @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 16:54 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

and admit that something that includes electronics could actually be creatively valid.

Had I known you in person I would have suggested fisticuffs over the suggestion that electronics take away. But Wendy Carlos has been a hero of mine for almost 20 years (by awareness, longer for her work) not the least for being responsible for the soundtracks for Tron and A Clockwork Orange. Also for everything else she did for synthesizers as honest musical instruments.

Honestly I suggested violence upon a good friend of mine for years because he insisted female vocals were always worse than male vocals. Then he finally listened to Metric cir. Fantasies and admitted that he was wrong.

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Fighting Words.

by cheapLEY @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 17:22 (1585 days ago) @ Harmanimus

and admit that something that includes electronics could actually be creatively valid.

Had I known you in person I would have suggested fisticuffs over the suggestion that electronics take away. But Wendy Carlos has been a hero of mine for almost 20 years (by awareness, longer for her work) not the least for being responsible for the soundtracks for Tron and A Clockwork Orange. Also for everything else she did for synthesizers as honest musical instruments.

The opinion that electronics and the rise of things like Garage Band (and it's actually professional quality counterparts) has led to lazier, less creative musicians is one of the most asinine opinions I've ever heard, especially when the opposite is actually true. As always, accessibility and options lead to more variety and higher quality in music in general. And, as always, there's no accounting for taste, but people that claim music of the past can never be surpassed leave me flabbergasted.

It's like claiming photography as a medium is somehow lesser because everyone carries around an actual quality camera in their pocket now. It just doesn't make any goddamn sense.

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Fighting Words.

by Harmanimus @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 18:02 (1585 days ago) @ cheapLEY

Given the fact that synthesizers have been around and electronics have been worming into popular music since before The Beatles were a band also kinda makes it extra silly.

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So...

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 18:06 (1585 days ago) @ Harmanimus

First, that was meant to come across in a semi-sarcastic tone, exaggerating and mocking what was literally said. Sorry if that wasn't clear.

Second, it was a story about the past.

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So...

by cheapLEY @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 18:45 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

First, that was meant to come across in a semi-sarcastic tone, exaggerating and mocking what was literally said. Sorry if that wasn't clear.

Second, it was a story about the past.

Sorry, I wasn't taking a dig at you. I wasn't really referring to what you said, but just piggy backing on what Harmaniums said and making a sweeping generalization about some folks I've talked with that think music stopped being good in somewhere in the late 70s.

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So...

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Monday, April 09, 2018, 20:25 (1585 days ago) @ cheapLEY

First, that was meant to come across in a semi-sarcastic tone, exaggerating and mocking what was literally said. Sorry if that wasn't clear.

Second, it was a story about the past.


Sorry, I wasn't taking a dig at you. I wasn't really referring to what you said, but just piggy backing on what Harmaniums said and making a sweeping generalization about some folks I've talked with that think music stopped being good in somewhere in the late 70s.

Heh, I know a lot of people my age who think of the 70s as a black hole musically, and it didn't bounce back until punk and new wave hit. I do think there are periods where music gets safe and stagnates. (We may be in one now.) Rock music, whatever that means now, is pretty old as a form. It's lasted much longer than, say, the Big Band era.

There are so many sources and types that I don't know if music is the cultural force it used to be. I mean, it used to be kind of like sports, something you could talk about with a relative stranger and find some common language. Now I'm not sure.

I know what you're talking about, though. I think many people tend to think of the music they listened to when they were young as the best music, and their tastes sort of calcify. i also know people who think that music to get better and better. I don't believe that either. I used to. I thought of the Beatles for example as a band that got better and better. Now I think the peak of their powers were right around Rubber Soul and Revolver. After that they became more fragmented, less focused, more experimental, and less consistent. They did amazing stuff like Sgt. Pepper, but it actually sounds more dated.

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So...

by Funkmon @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 23:26 (1585 days ago) @ Kermit

I thought of the Beatles for example as a band that got better and better. Now I think the peak of their powers were right around Rubber Soul and Revolver. After that they became more fragmented, less focused, more experimental, and less consistent. They did amazing stuff like Sgt. Pepper, but it actually sounds more dated.

That's wicked smart, Kermit. I've always wondered why that was but I never could put a finger on it.

When I would talk to my dad about them, he always told me I was lame for preferring a lot of the earlier stuff. I consider Help! to be their best album, but I think you're right. Have you heard Let It Be...Naked? It's actually an improvement on Let It Be IMO, but it also sounds like they're trying to get back to the Rubber Soul Beatles, but they've just gone too far and can't get that back.

Anyway, my dad, growing and maturing with the Beatles, was able to appreciate their experiments and increasing complexities as a teenager, as he was increasing in complexity. Those really resonate with him because of how the band evolved with him.

For me, as a person who had the entire catalogue available at once, I know what I liked and what I didn't like as much, and I heard it all out of context. It's kept me from perhaps liking John Lennon, but it has allowed me to really really enjoy Paul McCartney, and just about everything he has ever done.

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More Beatle talk

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 13:13 (1584 days ago) @ Funkmon
edited by Kermit, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 13:30

I thought of the Beatles for example as a band that got better and better. Now I think the peak of their powers were right around Rubber Soul and Revolver. After that they became more fragmented, less focused, more experimental, and less consistent. They did amazing stuff like Sgt. Pepper, but it actually sounds more dated.


That's wicked smart, Kermit. I've always wondered why that was but I never could put a finger on it.

When I would talk to my dad about them, he always told me I was lame for preferring a lot of the earlier stuff. I consider Help! to be their best album, but I think you're right. Have you heard Let It Be...Naked? It's actually an improvement on Let It Be IMO, but it also sounds like they're trying to get back to the Rubber Soul Beatles, but they've just gone too far and can't get that back.

Anyway, my dad, growing and maturing with the Beatles, was able to appreciate their experiments and increasing complexities as a teenager, as he was increasing in complexity. Those really resonate with him because of how the band evolved with him.

For me, as a person who had the entire catalogue available at once, I know what I liked and what I didn't like as much, and I heard it all out of context. It's kept me from perhaps liking John Lennon, but it has allowed me to really really enjoy Paul McCartney, and just about everything he has ever done.

They were indeed trying to get back to something during the “Let It Be” sessions. The album was originally going to be called “Get Back.” Yes, I’ve got the “naked” version. The band was kaput, Phil Spector got ahold of it, and his production has always been controversial.

Here’s how I got into the Beatles. In the early 70s, Yellow Submarine was the movie of the week on TV. I saw it, and began seeking out “Eleanor Rigby,” without knowing its name. I bought the Yellow Submarine ST, which, like most of their soundtracks in America (more on that later), had one side of Beatles and one side of George Martin orchestration. No Eleanor Rigby. For Christmas that year I got the red and blue anthology albums, so like you, I was exposed to most of the catalog at once. I also recorded (on 8-track no less!) a 12-hour BBC production called The Beatles Story off the radio. That gave me a lot of context. For my birthday a month later, I got Sgt. Pepper. These were the first four albums I owned.

As a preteen I adored McCartney. Wings was actually topping the charts at that time. There was this older teen stoner dude in the neighborhood who would drop nuggets of wisdom on us kids now and then, he and I got into a debate over Lennon vs. McCartney.

“Paul’s obviously the most talented,” I said.

“Talent isn’t everything,” he said.

By my mid-teens I’d gone through my Lennon appreciation phase and understood what the stoner dude meant. I think John & Yoko did some wacky things, but I’ve always admired his integrity and felt like he came to his positions honestly. I never sensed he did anything to try to please anyone (in contrast to Paul), and I don’t think he ever stopped thinking, which is saying something for a celebrity. (Imagine presents a straightforward Utopian fantasy; Revolution, on the other hand, is a pretty scathing classical liberal response to some of the excesses of the political movements on his side.) He had an amazing self-awareness—he didn’t run from his demons. Listen to “Jealous Guy”—it’s quite a song. By the time some asshole shot him, I was a big fan. (Boy, was that a weird week to work in a record store.)

Anyway “Help” is indeed a fantastic album. I assume you’re talking about the British version. Because I was first exposed to the American version with side 2 being instrumentals, I have trouble judging it the same way. Nevertheless, there was a time after being exposed to the British version when I considered it my favorite, too. The last 20 years or so I bounce back and forth between Rubber Soul and Revolver.

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More Beatle talk

by Harmanimus @, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 13:57 (1584 days ago) @ Kermit

Am I just weird because I never really had strong affinity to either John or Paul, and tend to find myself more a fan of George and Ringo?

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More Beatle talk

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 14:11 (1584 days ago) @ Harmanimus

Am I just weird because I never really had strong affinity to either John or Paul, and tend to find myself more a fan of George and Ringo?

Not at all! I love all four. They had unique personalities, and their individual appeal goes beyond their musical contributions. Each was essential.

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Well.

by Harmanimus @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 19:33 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

Modern me wouldn't suggest fisticuffs, either. Was meant to be a little cheeki breeki.

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Fighting Words.

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 18:59 (1585 days ago) @ Harmanimus

he insisted female vocals were always worse than male vocals.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by cheapLEY @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 18:42 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

my best friend (who has almost no interest or definable taste in music otherwise) got me into Meat Loaf. Yeah, I know - but the Bat Out of Hell albums do still kind of work for me, for some reason.

Bat Out of Hell II is still awesome. I've lost track of whether I like it ironically or unironically at this point, but I do love it. I have a real soft spot for that album.

During college, and the next 2-3 years after that, I started getting into the stuff I mentioned above. Emo, pop-punk, post-hardcore type stuff. While my own capacity to discover music was almost non-existent, I did make friends with a couple of guys who got me into things like Taking Back Sunday, Say Anything, and MCR. One of them also got me into Ben Folds - he played guitar and I heard him do a few Ben Folds Five songs. He also loaned me a few compilation albums. Warped Tour compilations, and a Drive-Thru Records/Fueled by Ramen sampler where I first heard my favorite band, Paramore. Side note: Paramore has probably been my favorite band since around 2007 when I got their second album, but I didn't actually realize that until more recently, like around 2014. It just finally hit me one day that I had never heard a song of theirs that I didn't love. For the most part, I kind of stuck to that same type of music, other than a brief fling with country music around 2005 or 2006. 4 or 5 years ago, I had a sudden epiphany that maybe pop music wasn't all terrible, but that realization really started around 2007:

Taking Back Sunday is another one of those bands that I have a real connection with. They're still putting out great stuff. The original band broke up after their first album with a rotating cast of members for every album after that until the original members got back together in 2010. My girlfriend at the time, two other friends, and I drove from here in Missouri up to Chicago to see them on the short little tour they did before starting work on their first album together since 2002. They've been together every since, and their stuff keeps getting better. They never made Tell All Your Friends 2 like every seemed to want, but I'm glad they haven't. Their latest record still has a great sound that's reminiscent of TAYF, but it's matured in a way that I really love.

I was working in an office at the time, and they had satellite radio rotating between a bunch of stations that the staff had chosen. Most of it didn't really interest me - I probably should have been excited to finally know what was playing on popular radio, but I was pretty thoroughly into my "I don't listen to popular music" stubbornness by then. But I do remember hearing my first Taylor Swift song (it was "Should've Said No," if you're wondering). Something about it struck me as different from the other stuff on that country station, though I didn't really know why. For the next several years, I always paid attention to her as she very quickly exploded, but I wouldn't have admitted it to anyone at the time. I actually remember a special about her coming on a TV news show when I was at my parents' place for Thanksgiving, and I very discretely made sure the TV stayed on that channel without really telling anyone why. A bit later, I think after her second album was out, a good friend of mine who is a MUCH more severe music snob than I have ever been, told he was learning one of Taylor's songs to play to his girlfriend (now wife), and he just happened to mention in passing "she writes her own songs, you know." This, in my mind, essentially gave me permission to become a shameless Stan. ANYWAY, the point of all this is that I remained one, and when 1989 came out I finally was convinced to listen to something outside of my guitar/bass/drums comfort zone, and admit that something that includes electronics could actually be creatively valid.

That sort of echoes my Taylor Swift journey. I didn't really start paying attention to her until Red, but 1989 was undoubtedly the album that made me really love her, and thankfully I had finally grown up enough to not care about only liking stuff that wasn't popular.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 21:58 (1585 days ago) @ cheapLEY
edited by stabbim, Monday, April 09, 2018, 22:03

Taking Back Sunday is another one of those bands that I have a real connection with. They're still putting out great stuff. The original band broke up after their first album with a rotating cast of members for every album after that until the original members got back together in 2010. My girlfriend at the time, two other friends, and I drove from here in Missouri up to Chicago to see them on the short little tour they did before starting work on their first album together since 2002. They've been together every since, and their stuff keeps getting better. They never made Tell All Your Friends 2 like every seemed to want, but I'm glad they haven't. Their latest record still has a great sound that's reminiscent of TAYF, but it's matured in a way that I really love.

I saw them at Riot Fest in Chicago last year! First time seeing them live. Unfortunately, I haven't done a good job keeping up with their newer stuff, but fortunately for me they managed to squeeze in a ton of material that I did know. Singing along with that crowd to "You're so Last Summer" was an experience I will never forget.

Oh, and being a Paramore (who were also at Riot Fest) fan I totally get the band maturing in spite of everyone. Someone was lamenting the loss of "old Paramore" recently and Hayley told them "they're on YouTube" LMFAO. I mean, it wasn't said in a mean way, but I laughed anyway.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 22:08 (1585 days ago) @ cheapLEY

thankfully I had finally grown up enough to not care about only liking stuff that wasn't popular.

Same. I love the quote starting around 1:20 in this:

Related: I've loved many things that Jack Antonoff has touched, so I bought the first Bleachers album (the one Jack's talking about here, not the newer one - yet) and it just arrived yesterday. Really liking it so far.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Funkmon @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 19:41 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

I went to an Incubus concert in high school (Hoobastank opened for them - oh yeah)

Wow, what a great experience that must have been, to see those two great bands connected for one show. Hoobastank is a tough act to follow.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 21:35 (1585 days ago) @ Funkmon

Wow, what a great experience that must have been, to see those two great bands connected for one show. Hoobastank is a tough act to follow.

It was, especially for being one of my earliest real concerts. And unlike some of the other music I listened to back then, I'm not the least bit embarrassed about those two.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Funkmon @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 22:46 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

(I would like to say "own," but I admit that I went through a BitTorrent phase many years ago in an attempt to catch up with all the great stuff I had missed - I'm not proud of it).

Meh. I actually do operate on the oft stated, rarely true, motto of the music pirate. If I like it, I'll buy it.

I have all those songs I have on the off chance I want to listen to them some time and then I will have them. At the time I decide I will listen to this band again, I buy the record.

Is this immoral? Yes. Is it technically damaging since they won't get the three cents a stream might bring them? Yes. But, considering I usually will only listen to a song once and then decide I don't like it, no great loss to either the artist or record company. So it's on the order of immorality where you use your stack of sticky notes at work to also write yourself personal messages, IMO.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by stabbim @, Des Moines, IA, USA, Monday, April 09, 2018, 22:59 (1585 days ago) @ Funkmon

Back when I used to do that, I told myself that since I had NO spare money to throw at anything other than bills and food, no one was getting paid either way. And in all fairness, it WAS actually true at the time (that was before music streaming services were really a thing). But I can now, so I do. And more importantly, I go to shows now. Which, from what I understand, is a much bigger income source for most artists than album sales or streaming.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Funkmon @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 23:37 (1585 days ago) @ stabbim

Yeah. I also am poor as butts and irresponsibly spend my money to buy the stupid records. I have to satiate myself at some level though.

Off topic, but it's so depressing to do NOTHING for months because you have no money. You buy nothing. You see nothing. You eat what the food bank has. You put off changing your oil an extra 500 miles until you get $25. It makes life a chore to live. You wake up and wish to go back to sleep so you don't have to deal with it anymore.

So on the occasion I find myself with extra money, be it from a sale of something online or a quick freelance job, I blow it immediately to stave off the howling void of despair.

$200 from an unexpected source? *Call up my sister* "April, I'm driving to Chicago, let's see the Tigers/White Sox series next week." That'll keep me going for 5 months.

Get that $5 gift card from Bing Rewards? I'll just mosey on over to Amazon and see if it's enough to buy an LP on my list. There's a good 3 month window I just bought.

Maybe I am just being brainwashed by the consumerism in the USA, but I need to actually do stuff or have things sometimes, and I might as well blow it on pointless records. At least I can look at them while I'm listening to a game.

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Not brainwashed.

by Harmanimus @, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 00:35 (1585 days ago) @ Funkmon

The fact that your basic needs aren't easily met and that is seen as acceptable is where the horrible consumer culture ruins people.

It's completely reasonable for your psyche. A couple months ago I took a friend to see a showing of Little Shop of Horrors. There was no way she could afford it on her own, but it seemed to be one of those things that breathed life into her when everything else was down.

I tend to mostly buy music when I'm having a rough time. I stream all the rest of the time. And I, personally, hold no shame for my years pirating music. I wouldn't have had half the experiences I've had with music if I didn't.

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This is about Music

by Pyromancy @, discovering fire every week, Monday, April 09, 2018, 18:00 (1585 days ago) @ INSANEdrive
edited by Pyromancy, Monday, April 09, 2018, 18:43

I'm loving this thread

This post is about Music. Marty recently gave a great talk at Kent State University regarding Music in Video Games (most specifically the Halo series).
This talk may not be for everyone, especially if you are a person that doesn't want to hear about the gritty specifics behind creating something great and would rather just continue enjoying the amazing final product unaware (ignorance can be bliss; since you might learn things in the process that could change the way you look at or feel about something, after the fact) Generally, learning more about something does not bother me and doesn't change my opinions or emotion about the product, but this might not be the case for anyone and everyone.

The talk is a compilation of many of the ideas, stories, and quips that have been heard before in various ways but wrapped up into one talk with some new bits added in


[1]

More people need to view this and I feel this thread has some folks in it that would truly enjoy seeing it

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Cool!

by cheapLEY @, Monday, April 09, 2018, 18:28 (1585 days ago) @ Pyromancy

Thanks for posting this. I'll definitely set aside some time some evening this week to watch it.

Marty has always impressed me. His music is obviously great, but he seems to really understand how to score video games in a way that very few others do (or did, I guess--it's definitely a lot better now, in general).

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Thanks for sharing this

by CruelLEGACEY @, Toronto, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 15:02 (1584 days ago) @ Pyromancy

- No text -

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Music is my cultural blindspot.

by CyberKN ⌂ @, Oh no, Destiny 2 seems complicated, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 10:19 (1584 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

People say "This song is good!" or "This song isn't so great!" and I'm just like, whatever, they all kinda sound the same to me. It been like that since I was in early grade school when my friends were getting way into artists like Fred Durst.

These days 99.9% of the stuff I listen to is video game soundtracks;

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Do you think Cohan and Metallica songs sound the same?

by Funkmon @, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 13:05 (1584 days ago) @ CyberKN

- No text -

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Do you think Cohan and Metallica songs sound the same?

by CyberKN ⌂ @, Oh no, Destiny 2 seems complicated, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 14:10 (1584 days ago) @ Funkmon
edited by CyberKN, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 14:13

No, of course not.

I just can't tell what makes most music "mediocre" versus "great", whereas most people seem to have some instinctual ability to do so.

On top of that, most people become obsessed with a particular genre or set of artists in their teenage years. I didn't.

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Do you think Cohan and Metallica songs sound the same?

by Harmanimus @, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 15:22 (1584 days ago) @ CyberKN

Most of that is a case of like v. dislike more than a case of judgement of any particular qualities. Often times works that are often technically more proficient or artistically more adventurous are less well liked by many folk compared to what made a band popular. So being “tone deaf” to what a lot of people like out of music is neither uncommon nor a bad thing itself.

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NBC's Blindspot is my cultural blindspot.

by Vortech @, A Fourth Wheel, Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 11:40 (1583 days ago) @ CyberKN

- No text -

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Some people used to think I was pretty good

by BeardFade ⌂, Portland, OR, Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 16:08 (1583 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

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Some people used to think I was pretty good +1

by dogcow @, Hiding from Bob, in the vent core., Thursday, April 12, 2018, 13:47 (1582 days ago) @ BeardFade

That was an enjoyable musical detour.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Xenos @, Shores of Time, Thursday, April 12, 2018, 14:51 (1582 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

I can never really describe what I like about music. When I try to I generally get offered examples I dislike, so rather than try and describe it I'll just say what are probably my two favorite musicians:

James Mercer (of The Shins and Broken Bells)

(Not that any one song is remotely representative of James Mercer, his style changes A LOT even on the same album)


KT Tunstall

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+1

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Thursday, April 12, 2018, 15:15 (1582 days ago) @ Xenos

Big Shins fan here. Seen them a few times.

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+1

by Xenos @, Shores of Time, Thursday, April 12, 2018, 15:25 (1582 days ago) @ Kermit

Awesome! I've seen them 4 times so far, and I'll usually travel up to 4 hours to see them. Awesome live musicians. Not always the best showman, but the music is even better live.

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There are a lot of great Music Minds here...

by Pyromancy @, discovering fire every week, Thursday, April 12, 2018, 16:37 (1582 days ago) @ INSANEdrive
edited by Pyromancy, Thursday, April 12, 2018, 16:45

There are a lot of great Music minds here. If we put all of our heads together could we possibly identify the first selection of music from the D2 Arecibo Adventure/Mission 'music box'?

(I meant to post to Raga's topic, but life happens, and now the topic is locked - I also didn't really want to 'Vagueness' it back up 3 weeks late and have the post get buried)
I compared my notes with Ragashingo's and everything lined up. I agree, that I have never seen anyone identify the first piece of music from the Arecibo mission.
Could it be an original piece put together by the Audio team, to sound ancient and Asian/Japanese influenced? Is that why it is so difficult to research and find?

__________________________________________________

By the way, did anyone ever read into the handcannon, Guseva-C, you are awarded at the end of the Adventure/Mission Arecibo?

[image]
Flavor Text:
"You know your purpose"

I looked this up after my first playthrough all those months back in September and have never brought it up to anyone. I also have never really seen anyone else bring it up either, I don't think...
It really is a fascinating tidbit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khioniya_Guseva
(My paraphrase):
C/K/J Guseva/Guseyva was a syphilis riddled (rumor), likely manipulated, probably crazed, peasant woman, with no nose, who attemted to assassinate Rasputin by stabbing him in the abdomen, and then reportedly ran through the streets screaming "I have killed the AntiChrist!"

This weapon follows the Häkke naming convention of weapons named after famous warriors, particularly those that try to disembowel others.

Another interesting note from the Arecibo mission, and this one has been discovered and pointed out by others before, is at the beginning of the mission Ghost requests Asher check out frequency transmissions on channel 'J-1869'. Rasputin was born on January 21, 1869.
http://www.ishtar-collective.net/transcripts/adventure-arecibo

__________________________________________________

Furthermore, If we put all of our 'Music heads' together could we work together and try to figure out what appears to be a remaining Music mystery or two in D1? (which might be tied to The Oracles in the Vault of Glass? - Rampant Speculation)
https://destiny.bungie.org/forum/index.php?&id=145820
https://destiny.bungie.org/forum/index.php?id=147370
https://destiny.bungie.org/forum/index.php?id=148176

In a matter of a few weeks that mystery will likely be blown wide open by a group of selfish minds that have been not-so-quietly working behind closed and locked doors.

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Lyrics to live by

by Dame117 @, Missouri, Sunday, April 22, 2018, 16:31 (1572 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

Sometimes a song (or lyrics) come in to your life at just the right time.

Many of you will recognize this line:
"Hope shines brightest in the dark, if we believe"

Who knew that a line from a song written for a video game about shooting 'aliens' would become the most powerful song in my life.

This lyric resonates with me so much right now that I got it custom printed in to a wall decal and it is above my bed where I can see it every day.

[image]



I will make another post later about my music habits / moods / likes :)

Good thread idea, I've enjoyed reading other's posts and checking out some of the musical artists they shared

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+1

by Kermit @, Raleigh, NC, Sunday, April 22, 2018, 18:28 (1572 days ago) @ Dame117

I liked the song very much within the context of Music of the Spheres. Thank goodness we've gotten to hear it.

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Get to Know your Fellow D.B.Oer | Music

by Morpheus @, High Charity, Wednesday, May 02, 2018, 10:24 (1562 days ago) @ INSANEdrive

  • What do you look for in music? What is musics purpose for you?
  • How has your taste for music changed, if they have, through the years and what do you think caused this/these change(s)?
  • Bonus Question: Have you ever played an instrument? If so do you still play? Are or were you any good? Is there anything you've thought about playing?

Music has always been the most important thing in my life. To a fault. I literally go into mood swings and/or depression when my headphones break. It's not too much of a big deal now, since iPhones come with speakers, but whenever music was gone from reasonable access for a good amount of time, I'd be ready to commit suicide! I'm so glad to be able to listen to such amazing works by so many different groups and artists and genres. Music really is the biggest part of me.

What I look for in music is something exciting! Something that draws me to create, form and mold into a work I'm proud of. Every time I hear a song, I can't help but synchronize visuals to it, and seeing if it would work! Every song that passes though my ears makes me wonder if it would be a good 'fit' for a montage. I guess that's always been within me. My tastes for music has changed throughout adolescence and adulthood, when I hear something new that I enjoy, I tend to find out who made the song and see if there are others like it! I'm always open to at least try something new in music. If I don't like it, so be it. If I do, I expand. For the last question, I did play the piano and the violin. Sucked at the piano, although I would like to re-learn that--but I was good at the violin. But when middle school ended, so did Orchestra. But anyway...I'd also love to get some guitar lesson in, too.

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